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Artist-in-residence

The NTU CCA Singapore Residencies programme is an integral part of the NTU CCA Singapore’s mission as a research centre and hosts artists, curators, critics and scholars from Singapore and abroad. The studio-based Residencies programme is dedicated to facilitating the production of knowledge and research for and by established and emerging artists. It serves as a forum for cultural and artistic exchange in Southeast Asia, augmented with public events Residencies: Insights / Studio Sessions / OPEN series, ranging from open studio sessions, lectures, live performances, to special projects in The Lab, NTU CCA Singapore’s space for curatorial experimentation. The application for residency at NTU CCA Singapore is via nomination, please email NTUCCAresidencies@ntu.edu.sg for more information.

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Tiffany Chung

Residency period

7 July – 3 September 2014

About

Tiffany Chung’s work examines conflict, migration, urban progress, and transformation in relation to history and cultural memory as she explores the geographical shifts in countries that have been traumatized by war, human destruction, or natural disaster. Chung’s studies of the growth, decline, or disappearance of towns and cities focus on issues of urban development, environmental catastrophe, and humanitarian crisis. Chung’s drawings involve a complex layering of topographies from different historical periods, reflecting the impossibility of accurately creating cartographic representations. Transgressing space and time, these works unveil the connection between imperialist ideologies and visions of modernity.

Chung holds an MFA from University of California, Santa Barbara (2000) and a BFA from California State University, Long Beach (1998). She was awarded the Sharjah Biennial Artist Prize in 2013. Selected museum exhibitions and biennials include: Sharjah Biennial (2013); California Pacific Triennial, Newport Beach (2013); Asia Pacific Triennial, Brisbane (2012); Six Lines of Flight, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (2012);  Chung is a co-founder of Sàn Art, an independent, artist-initiated, non-profit gallery space & reading room in Ho Chi Minh City.

Focus

Tiffany Chung's research explores the notion of “colonialism as civilising mission”, predominantly in the sphere of public works that the British carried out in Singapore, in comparison with the policy that underlay the construction of Indochina by French imperialism during its colonial rule in the neighbouring region. These comparative studies examined the connections between imperialism and modernity, the continuities of late-colonialism and the process of nation building – whether it is the construction of a national history or its national land development.

Chung looked into the local Vietnamese Refugee Camps as well as the National Archives of Singapore and the National Museum Archives of Singapore.

Public programmes

Artist’s talk and open studio: Tiffany Chung
28 Aug 2014, Thu 7:30pm - 9:00pm

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Tiffany Chung’s work examines conflict, migration, urban progress and transformation in relation to history and cultural memory. It explores the geographical shifts in countries that were traumatized by war, human destruction or natural disaster. Whether Chung’s studies of the growth, decline or disappearance of towns and cities focus on urban development, environmental catastrophe or humanitarian crisis, her ethnographic research and interviews often play into her re-narrations of historical sites.

Chung’s map drawings layer different periods in history of devastated topographies, reflecting the impossibility of accurately creating cartographic representations of most places. Transgressing space and time, these works unveil the connection between imperialist ideology and vision of modernity. Her maps interweave historical and geologic events, spatial and sociopolitical changes with future predictions, revealing cartography as a discipline that draws on the realms of perception and fantasy as much as geography. Often incorporating international treaties with local histories, Chung’s work remaps memories that were denied in official records. Her mixed-media installations excavate layers of history, re-write chronicles of places, and create interventions into the spatial narratives produced through statecraft.