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Artist-in-residence

The NTU CCA Singapore Residencies programme is an integral part of the NTU CCA Singapore’s mission as a research centre and hosts artists, curators, critics and scholars from Singapore and abroad. The studio-based Residencies programme is dedicated to facilitating the production of knowledge and research for and by established and emerging artists. It serves as a forum for cultural and artistic exchange in Southeast Asia, augmented with public events Residencies: Insights / Studio Sessions / OPEN series, ranging from open studio sessions, lectures, live performances, to special projects in The Lab, NTU CCA Singapore’s space for curatorial experimentation. The application for residency at NTU CCA Singapore is via nomination, please email NTUCCAresidencies@ntu.edu.sg for more information.

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Jamie North

Residency period

1 November – 22 December 2017

About

Jamie North (b. 1971, Australia) is an artist based in Sydney. His practice explores the concurrence and conflict between architectural structures and the biological world. Initially working with photography, North’s interest in the ability of plants to recover, regenerate, and reclaim an environment after human intervention has shifted towards the creation of living sculptural installations. His work has been presented at the 20th Biennale of Sydney, Australia, 2016; Tophane-i Amire Cultural and Arts Center, Istanbul, Turkey, 2015; Monash University, Melbourne, 2015, amongst other venues.

Focus

During the residency, North will be conducting photographic investigations on the ways in which local plant species manage to adapt to Singapore’s constantly changing built environment. In alignment with his long-standing interest in the intersection between the natural and the artificial, North regards Singapore as a radical case study to observe the complex tensions brimming at the interface between nature and human-made structures. He will also focus on the inescapable cycles of decomposition and renewal that, accelerated by the high humidity of the tropical climate, blur the boundaries between the organic and the man-made.