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NTU CCA Singapore Exhibitions is focused on contemporary artistic production that provides a critical platform for reflection and discussion. The exhibition programme embraces artistic production in all its diverse media with a commitment to current debates in visual culture. NTU CCA Singapore presents up to four exhibitions a year ranging in format from group to solo shows giving voice to a diversity of international artists. Each exhibition is accompanied by an extensive public programme of tours, talks and workshops that foster reflections on the exhibition from various perspectives and disciplines.

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Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again

22 March 2019 — 23 June 2019

Opening reception: Thursday, 21 March 2019, 7.00–9.00pm

 

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore is pleased to present Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again, an exhibition project that initiated from a conversation between Belgian curator Philippe Pirotte and Jakarta-based artist Ade Darmawan. Reconsidering Indonesian author Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s epic book Arus Balik (1995), which could be translated into English as a “turning of the tide,” the eponymous exhibition takes the novel as a starting point to reflect on perspectival shifts in geopolitical, cultural, social, religious, and natural spheres.

In his fictional account, Pramoedya elaborates on the weakening of the maritime culture of Javanese kingdoms in the early 16th century, the progressive Islamisation, and the beginning of Portuguese occupation on parts of the now Malay and Indonesian peninsula and archipelago. Important is that Pramoeda’s reversal of perspective as a meta-geographical impulse is comparable to the notion of the “inverted telescope” Benedict Anderson advances in his seminal book Spectre of Comparisons (1998): as a non-Eurocentric method of comparison in which for example Portugal is viewed from the standpoint of Southeast Asia, as through an inverted telescope, which causes a kind of vertigo. Pramoedya suggests that the final decline of the Majapahit empire, and the “change from traditional independence to colonial possession,” was largely caused by the different Javanese kingdoms having gradually turned their backs to the sea.

The participating artists expand on this prompt through installations, sculptures, films, performances, and texts, both existing works as well as new commissions. Ade Darmawan re-read Arus Balik with a special focus on how protagonists use natural resources, and will create a distilling dispositive with alkaline water from the straits, recalling that all the scrambling for the control of the archipelago was about the extraction of ore and goods. ila questions what it means to be Boyanese, Buginese, Minangkabau, or Javanese through encounters with Singapore residents now conflated as Malay. Their testimonies will be written on her body and wither, while exposed to salty water and weather on reclaimed areas of Singapore island. Paradise Blueprint (2017), a wallpaper designed by Zac Langdon-Pole, based on a cyanotype photogram of the removed legs of a so-called “Bird of Paradise,” addresses the history of cultural exchange and mythology surrounding the birds native to Papua New Guinea. Lucy Raven creates silk paintings or monoprints, made by imprint of sedimentation in erosion tables, as scrim backdrops she uses for a forthcoming film-production, called Kongkreto, inspired by the 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines that finally chased off the Americans from Clark Airbase. Book-aficionado, artist, and writer Shubigi Rao delves into the stories related to the difficult conditions, but also extraordinary examples of solidarity Pramoedya faced on prison island Buru while writing Arus Balik. A new video-installation by Melati SuryodarmoDancing under the Black Sky (2019), traces the history behind Reog performances, an art form of resistance and criticism of Ponorogo people of East Java towards Bhre Kertabhumi, a Majapahit king who slowly lost his authority in the 15th century, before Islam became a major force in Demak and controlled the coastal region of Java.

The exhibition Arus Balik aims to imagine the implication of histories and politics in processes of transition, such as colonisation and decolonisation, or shifts in maritime power for people and ports below (the straits of Malacca, South China Sea, Java Sea, and further east) and above (the Indian Ocean and further West) the wind. Have the multiple colonisations in Southeast Asia alienated the people from the sea coast? Is it possible to attempt a return? The reversal of the colonial fact, the promise of reversal of a geo-political, -cultural, and social systems, initially embodied by the Bandung conference in 1955, caused Afro-American author Richard Wright to write that “it smacked of tidal waves, of natural forces.”

The accompanying public programmes further investigate the topics raised, including a conversation on Saturday, March 23, around the book Arus Balik and the reception of Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s oeuvre. On Saturday, May 25, another conversation will focus on living with the sea and the history of the straits.

Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again is NTU CCA Singapore’s response and contribution to this year’s nation-wide bicentennial commemorations that reflect on Singapore’s history since the arrival of the British statesman Sir Stamford Raffles in 1819, considered the founder of modern Singapore.

Guest curated by Philippe Pirotte, Rector, Staatliche Hochschule für Bildende Künste – Städelschule, and Director, Portikus, Frankfurt, and Visiting Professor (2018/19), MA Museum Studies and Curatorial Practices, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU.

 

 

 

Image caption: Ade Darmawan, Ferry trip from Merak to Bakauheni, Sunda Strait, Indonesia, 2018, documentation. Courtesy the artist.

Public programmes

Workshop for Teachers and Educators by art educator Kelly Reedy (Singapore/United States)
23 Mar 2019, Sat 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM
26 Apr 2019, Fri 03:00 PM - 05:30 PM

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Turning Tides: Identities in Transit

Taking inspiration from the novel Arus Balik (1995) by Indonesian author Pramoedya Ananta Toer, this workshop will examine how the turning of historical tides form our personal and collective identities. The work of six artists, Ade Darmawan (Indonesia), ila (Singapore), Zac Langdon-Pole (New Zealand/Germany), Shubigi Rao (India/Singapore), Lucy Raven (United States), and Melati Suryodarmo (Indonesia) will guide and challenge us on this journey, probing how social, geopolitical, religious, and cultural transitions in this region have influenced our concept of who we are, where we come from, and where we are going.

This workshop is free of charge and suitable for all educational levels. While it is targeted towards teachers and educators, it is open to all. For more information and to register, head to turningtides.peatix.com.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Kelly Reedy (United States/Singapore) has worked in Singapore for over 18 years as an artist and educator. She holds a BFA in Fine Art (University of Wisconsin, 1985), MA in Education (Hunter College, 1991), MA in Art Therapy (LASALLE College of the Arts, 2017). She has exhibited her artworks internationally in Paris, Chicago, and Berlin, as well as locally at Jendela Visual Arts Space, Esplanade, Singapore Tyler Print Institute, and Alliance Fran.aise. Reedy has developed educational resources for the National Gallery Singapore and trained teachers at the National Institute of Education, specialising in visual arts education in museums and galleries.

 

 

Image caption: Workshop for Teachers and Educators by Kelly Reedy, December 2018. Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore.

In Conversation Part I: Arus Balik with Ade Darmawan, Shubigi Rao, and Melati Suryodarmo, moderated by Philippe Pirotte
23 Mar 2019, Sat 03:30 PM - 06:00 PM

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The first session of a two-part conversation, this panel discussion will focus on the book Arus Balik (1995) by Indonesian author Pramoedya Ananta Toer, which is the starting point for the eponymous exhibition that will be on view. Three of the participating artists will be joined by Philippe Pirotte, the curator of the exhibition, to discuss Ananta Toer’s body of work, its influence and legacy, as well as notions of censorship and the forbidden book.

 

Image caption: Shubigi Rao, research documentation for Pulp (2013–ongoing). Singular transcribed copy of forgotten oral stories, from writer Syeda Hamed’s personal collection, New Delhi, India. Courtesy the artist.

Workshop: Reclaiming Nusantara? by artists ila, Norah Lea and Nurshafitri Ya’akob (all Singapore)
6 Apr 2019, Sat 03:00 PM - 05:30 PM

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Workshop fee: $10

Registration required via Peatix

 

Where is the Nusantara? Who is the Nusantara? What do we align ourselves with in the past and what futures will we create together?

This workshop, a follow-up to a previously ran workshop held last year, Siapa Dia Wanita Nusantara (Who is the Nusantara Woman?), aims to create conversations around the idea of the “Nusantara”, an arguably dated and oftentimes unclear regional construct that has resurfaced every now and then with regards to recent waves of conversations around decolonisation of the Malay archipelago. Centering around themes of intersecting identities, belonging, and speculative histories, this workshop invites anyone who feel that they can benefit from, by sharing about their own stories and experiences, the explorations of their personal oral histories, through spoken word and a collective imagining of the past and future.

 

BIOGRAPHY

ila (Singapore) is a visual and performance artist who works with found objects, moving images, and live performance. She seeks to create alternative nodes of experience and entry points into the peripheries of the unspoken, the tacit, and the silenced. With light as her medium of choice, and invisible communities as her point of interest, ila weaves imagined narratives into existing realities. Using her body as a space of tension, negotiation, and confrontation, she creates work that generates discussions about gender, history, and identity in relation to pressing contemporary issues. ila has performed at National Design Centre (2019), Performance Archives Resource Orchestrator, Singapore (2018); and ArtScience Late, Singapore (2018); had a solo presentation at Coda Culture, Singapore (2018); and exhibited at OH! Open House, Singapore (2019); Objectifs – Centre for Photography & Film, Singapore (2016), Ketemu Project Space, Bali (2016), and Unifiedfield, Granada (2015); among others.

Norah Lea (Singapore) is a multidisciplinary artist whose works investigate the performative aspects of our identities. Her work is rooted in self-portraiture, exploring themes such as gender, sexuality, and ethnicity through photography, film, performance, and spoken word. 

Nurshafitri Ya’akob (Singapore) explores the nuanced psyche that individuals keep hidden in their subconscious. She expounds on the duality and sometimes hypocrisy of certain ideologies and theories that have been made palatable for the society. 

 

A public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again.

 

Image caption: ila, BEKAS, 2019, video still. Courtesy the artist.

In Conversation: ila and Khim Ong, NTU CCA Singapore
16 Apr 2019, Tue 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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The artist will expand on the works she has developed for the exhibition, which directly address matters of provenance and heritage. ila reflects on what it means to live on an island, and explores the collective memory of living in close relationship with the sea and its manifold stories. She will also discuss how she uses her body as a space of confrontation and negotiation, and how her performance work explores issues about gender, identity, and historical narratives.

 

A public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again.

 

 

Image caption: ila, the sons and daughters of hungry ghosts, 2019, photographic print, 29.7 x 42 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Screening and conversation: Kiri Dalena and Lucy Raven, moderated by Philippe Pirotte
14 May 2019, Tue 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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Screenings by Filipino human-right activist, artist, and filmmaker Kiri Dalena and by American artist Lucy Raven will be followed by a conversation with both artists. Based on the true story of the drowning of a young activist, Dalena’s film From The Dark Depths (2017) opens with a beautiful and surreal sequence underwater in which a woman dances slowly brandishing a red flag. Around her, many red flags are planted in the seabed. This hypnotic and captivating dream is shuttered by sequences with authentic 16mm, analog and digital video footage from the artist’s own archive with documentation of political unrest spanning for two decades, and an ominous long-track of a police car at night prompting the citizens to respect the curfew—a gloomy reminder of a lost freedom. Lucy Raven will screen materials connected to a new film-in-progress, alongside several recent short videos

 

BIOGRAPHY

Kiri Dalena (Philippines) is an acclaimed visual artist and filmmaker known for her works which reveal persistent social injustices and inequalities, particularly in the Philippines. She graduated from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños with an undergraduate degree in Human Ecology, and pursued further studies in 16mm documentary filmmaking at the Mowefund Film Institute. She has been featured in several international art events such as the Singapore Biennale (2013), Yokohama Triennale (2014), and the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015). Her works are currently in the permanent collections of the Singapore Art Museum, Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Ateneo Art Gallery.

 

 

Image caption: Lucy Raven, 3-3-19: Debris flow erosion, wet cement on dry cement and sand-L, 2019, cement and sand on silk, 214 x 133 cm, process documentation. Courtesy the artist.rtist.

Screening Series: Faces of Histories
14 May 2019, Tue - 18 Jul 2019, Thu

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SCHEDULE

All works will be screened in a loop during opening hours, Tuesday – Sunday, 12.00 – 7.00pm.

14 May – 19 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, From the Dark Depths, 2017

21 May – 26 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, Red Saga, 2004

28 May – 9 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Vietnam the Movie, 2015

11 June – 23 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Fifth Cinema, 2018

25 June – 7 July 2019 (except 28 – 30 June): Munem Wasif, Kheyal, 2015–18

9 July – 17 July 2019: Munem Wasif, Machine Matter, 2017

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This screening series features artist films and video works that examine the socio-political and environmental effects colonisation and industrialisation have had on how we frame and perceive places and histories. Artists explore the realities of constructing a new identity amidst changing borders, overwritten cultures, and blurred lines of fact or fiction. The screening series includes works by artists Kiri Dalena (Philippines), Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam), and Munem Wasif (Bangladesh). Each work will be shown for a period of one to two weeks on loop during opening hours.

 

FILM SYNOPSES

14 May – 19 May 2019 

From the Dark Depths, Kiri Dalena, 2017, 27 min

Based on the true story of the drowning of a young activist, Dalena’s film From The Dark Depths opens with a beautiful and surreal sequence underwater in which a woman dances slowly brandishing a red flag. Around her, many red flags are planted in the seabed. This hypnotic and captivating dream is shuttered by sequences with authentic 16mm, analogue, and digital video footage from the artist’s own archive. This includes documentation of political unrest spanning two decades and an ominous long-track of a police car at night prompting the citizens to respect the curfew—a gloomy reminder of a lost freedom.

Kiri Dalena will be in conversation with artist and filmmaker Lucy Raven and curator Philippe Pirotte on 14 May 2019, 7.00 – 8.30pm, as part of the public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again. Details of the programme here.

 

21 May – 26 May 2019

Red Saga, Kiri Dalena, 2004, 15 min

Red Saga (2004), recounts the intense armed hostility towards radical individuals and serves as a call for sustained uprising. Amidst scenes of children faithfully guarding the last harvest from thieves, a red flag is waved with movements building in vigor and determination with each act of silenced injustice. This poetic film offers a glimpse into the passion and pain of the people’s protracted war in the Philippine countryside.

 

28 May – 9 June 2019

Vietnam the Movie, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2015, 45min

Vietnam the Movie uses a carefully structured montage of clips from drama and documentary films to give a chronological account of Vietnamese history from the mid-1950s to the late 1970s, encompassing the end of French colonialism and the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War. The excerpts chosen contrast a variety of external and often oppositional views, ranging from mainstream Hollywood drama to European art-house. Source material from the United States includes Apocalypse NowBorn on the Fourth of July, and Forrest Gump, whilst Europe is represented by the works of Harun Farocki, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, and Jean-Luc Godard. Nguyen also inserts extracts from the films of Nagisa Oshima, Satyajit Ray, and Ann Hui. This technique suggests that any “true” picture of Vietnam has been lost to the multiplicity of symbolic purposes to which the country, its people, and their tribulations have been put. Nguyen’s re-situated selection and collection of archival material offers the viewer an alternative memory and recollection of history.

 

11 June – 23 June 2019

Fifth Cinema, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2018, 56 min

Foregoing voice in favour of the written wordand juxtaposing moving images of the filmmaker’s own daughter with archival images of Vietnamese women seen through the lens of the “ship’s officers”, Fifth Cinemaslowly leads the viewer through a narrative of colonialism, indigeneity, and cinematic limitations in representation. The film’s text – by Maori filmmaker Barry Barclay, who coined the term “Fourth Cinema” to distinguish Indigenous cinema from the established “First, Second, and Third Cinema” framework– provides structure to Nguyen’s hybrid essay film that moves on multiple cinematic and topical terrains.Fifth Cinema premiered at The 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art in 2018. 

 

25 June – 7 July 2019

Kheyal, Munem Wasif, 2015–18, 23 min 34 sec

Kheyal follows four characters through the streets of Old Dhaka in Bangladesh. The title is derived from the Arabic word “Khyal” or “Khayal,” meaning fiction or imagination. The film captures the enigmatic environments and unique identities inhabiting the historic city. Wasif describes his film as a work of magic realism, where the lone characters are “lost in certain mental states and found in other magical situations.” The film shifts between real and imagined narratives, navigating between the conscious and subconscious, and reveals the very different rhythm of life that inhabits the old city. Kheyal was produced with the support of Bengal Foundation and first shown at The 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art in 2018.

 

7 – 17 July 2019

Machine Matter, Munem Wasif, 2017, 14 min 5 sec

Wasif examines the death of the jute industry in Bangladesh and the destruction of the livelihoods the “golden fibre” once supported. Until the mid-20th century, the jute industry was strong in the Indian subcontinent as jute twine was employed to package the world’s cotton, grains, coffee, sugar, and cement. However, with the shift of power from East Bengal to Pakistan after the partition in 1947, the jute industry began to generate most of the income for the new state, diverting profits away from small stakeholders in East Bengal and leaving factories without work. Using still frames, the artist captures an abandoned jute mill and the former workers who ran the machines—the union of man and machine that formed the heart of a major industry. 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Kiri Dalena (Philippines) is an acclaimed visual artist and filmmaker known for her works which reveal persistent social injustices and inequalities, particularly in the Philippines. She graduated from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños with an undergraduate degree in Human Ecology, and pursued further studies in 16mm documentary filmmaking at the Mowefund Film Institute. She has been featured in several international art events such as the Singapore Biennale (2013), Yokohama Triennale (2014), and the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015). Her works are currently in the permanent collections of the Singapore Art Museum, Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Ateneo Art Gallery.

 

Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam) is a Hanoi-based filmmaker and moving image artist. Her diverse practice – traversing boundaries between film and video art, installation and performance – consistently engages with memory and history, and reflects on the roles and positions of art and artists in society and the environment. Nguyen studied journalism, photography, international relations, and ethnographic film in the United States. Her films and video art works have been shown at festivals and art exhibitions including Asia Pacific Triennale of Contempory Art (APT9) in Brisbane2018; Sydney Biennale2018; Jeu de Paume, Paris; CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux; the Lyon Biennale 2015; Asian Art Biennial 2015, Taiwan; Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial 2014; Singapore Biennale 2013; Jakarta Biennale 2013; Oberhausen International Film Festivaland the Rotterdam International Film Festival. Nguyen is founder and director of Hanoi DOCLAB, an independent centre for documentary film and the moving image art in Hanoi since 2009. She previously showed at NTU CCA Singapore in the exhibition Ghosts and Spectres – Shadows of History (2017).

 

Munem Wasif (Bangladesh) explores complex socio-political issues through photography and video. His artistic practice is marked by close engagement and intimate commitment, both physical and psychological, to his subjects of interest and it usually unfolds through long-term research processes. While interested in the archival and social value of documentary photography, his works often confound the boundaries between fact and fiction. He has participated in international exhibitions such as Sharjah Biennial 14 (2019); the 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2018-19); An Atlas of Mirrors, Singapore Biennale (2016), among numerous others. Wasif is currently Artist-in-Residence at NTU CCA Singapore (2 April – 1 July 2019).

 

This screening series runs in parallel to NTU CCA Singapore’s current exhibition Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again, responding to themes of the Singapore Bicentennial.

 

Image caption: Kiri Dalena, Gikan sa Ngitngit nga Kinailadman (From the Dark Depths), 2017, Single-channel video, sound, 27 min. Courtesy the artist.

In Conversation Part II: Living with the Sea
with ila (Singapore), Mirwan Andan (Indonesia), Nirwan Arsuka (Indonesia), Zac Langdon-Pole (Aotearoa New Zealand/Germany), Dr Imran bin Tajudeen (Singapore), and Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore), moderated by Philippe Pirotte (Belgium/Germany)
25 May 2019, Sat 03:30 PM - 05:30 PM

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The second session of a two-part conversation, this panel discussion will focus on the history of the straits, historical maps, and the geography of maritime Southeast Asia. This involves an approach to Southeast Asia through underlying indigenous patterns, which will necessarily stretch the limits of ingrained westernised cultural visions and mental habits. The participants will discuss complexities of heritage, notions of belonging, and strategies of mapping. Rather than a static given, the Straits will be considered as an environment with an incipient psychology, invoking a transpiring age-old knowledge of the region, but also as a habitat that continues to profoundly influence our existence.

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

ila (Singapore) is a visual and performance artist who works with found objects, moving images, and live performance. She seeks to create alternative nodes of experience and entry points into the peripheries of the unspoken, the tacit, and the silenced. With light as her medium of choice, and invisible communities as her point of interest, ila weaves imagined narratives into existing realities. Using her body as a space of tension, negotiation, and confrontation, she creates work that generates discussions about gender, history, and identity in relation to pressing contemporary issues. ila has performed at National Design Centre (2019), Performance Archives Resource Orchestrator, Singapore (2018); and ArtScience Late, Singapore (2018); had a solo presentation at Coda Culture, Singapore (2018); and exhibited at OH! Open House, Singapore (2019); Objectifs – Centre for Photography & Film, Singapore (2016), Ketemu Project Space, Bali (2016), and Unifiedfield, Granada (2015); among others.

 

Mirwan Andan (Indonesia) was born and raised in Watampone, South Sulawesi. From 1999 to 2004, he enrolled at the Universitas Hasanuddin, Makassar, majoring in French Literature. In early 2005, he moved to Jakarta and in 2012 graduated from Political Science, while working in ruangrupa as a researcher and developer since 2007. He was invited to talk in several forums, seminars, and conferences such as Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society Conference, Surabaya (2015); State of Independence – A Global Forum in Alternative Space, Los Angeles (2011); and Expressing Political Aspiration Creatively, Jakarta (2011). In 2015, Andan was researcher for the Jakarta Biennale.

 

Nirwan Ahmad Arsuka (Indonesia) completed his formal education in Nuclear Engineering, Gadjah Mada State University. He has worked as a guest editor for Kompas Daily, a member of the Curator Board of Bentara Budaya Jakarta, and as Director of the Freedom Institute. His writings have appeared in the Inter-Asian Cultural Studies and International Journal of Asian Studies. His publications include Two Essays (Trilingual edition: Indonesian, English, German. 2016), Percakapan dengan Semesta (A Conversation with the Universe) (2017), and Semesta Manusia (This Universe of Mankind) (2018). Since 2014, he has been actively developing Pustaka Bergerak Indonesia (Indonesian Mobile Library Network), a grassroot literacy movement.

 

Zac Langdon-Pole‘s (Aotearoa New Zealand/Germany) work is underpinned by questions of belonging, translation, and identification. He has worked in a variety of media, including sculpture, performance, photography, film, textiles, poetry, installation, and using the work of other artists, to explore the processes of montage, transposition, travelling, reinterpretation, collaboration, and appropriation. He is the latest recipient of the BMW Art Journey Prize (2018), was awarded the Art Viva Prize for Visual Arts in Germany (2017), and received the Charlotte Prinz Stipendium in Darmstadt (2016).

 

Dr Imran bin Tajudeen (Singapore) is Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore. He researches architectural encounters in Singapore and Southeast Asia, first in their intersections with colonial practices, modern interventions, and colonial and nationalist heritage representation, and second through historiographical questions on Southeast Asia’s Indic and Islamic architecture from a vernacular architectural perspective. He was a postdoctoral fellow at MIT’s AKPIA (2009­–10) and the IIAS in Leiden (2010–11). He is co-editor of Southeast Asia’s Modern Architecture: Questions in Translation, Epistemology and Power (2018), and is currently working on a monograph that extends his doctoral dissertation on the local/regional and cosmopolitan in the vernacular urban heritage of Maritime Southeast Asia.

 

Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore) is a visual artist. Having had an itinerant childhood, she is interested in place attachment and displacement. Her practice draws on historical and field research and reflects on human relationship with nature. Her work has been presented at the Singapore Art Museum at 8Q; the Singapore International Photography Festival; the Photobook Exhibition for Athens Photo Festival; the Obscura Festival of Photography, Penang; the Chiang Mai University Art Center; and The Substation, Singapore.

 

A public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again.

 

Image caption: Zac Langdon-Pole, Passport (Argonauta) (viii), 2018, paper nautilus shell, Campo del Cielo meteorite (iron; coarse octahedrite, landsite: Chaco / Santiago del Estero, Argentina), 9.4 x 3.1 x 5.3 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Workshop: Visualising Sense of Place through Map-Making by artist Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore)
1 Jun 2019, Sat 03:00 PM - 06:00 PM

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Workshop fee: $10

Registration required via Peatix

 

Artist Juria Toramae will discuss mapmaking as an art form and will guide the participants with the basics of creating a map. The workshop will include conceptualising and drawing a map of one’s own imagined Singapore.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore) is a visual artist. Having had an itinerant childhood, she is interested in place attachment and displacement. Her practice draws on historical and field research and reflects on human relationship with nature. Her work has been presented at the Singapore Art Museum at 8Q, the Singapore International Photography Festival, The Photobook Exhibition for Athens Photo Festival; the Obscura Festival of Photography, Penang; the Chiang Mai University Art Center; and The Substation, Singapore.

 

A public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again.

 

Image caption: Juria Toramae, Geylang Rain, 2016, digital print on paper. Courtesy the artist.