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Michael Lee (Singapore)
Creatif Compleks
17 Mar 2018, Sat 02:00 PM - 03:00 PM
17 Mar 2018, Sat - 17 Jun 2018, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Developed during his residency at NTU CCA Singapore, Creatif Compleks (2018) is the culmination of Michael Lee’s reflection on the function of the artist’s studio within the arts ecology of a city. The work takes the form of a diagram about a hypothetical property development consisting of various configurations of the artist’s home/studio. The use of LED light strips, a popular fixture in advertising and interior design, alludes to latent apprehensions about the development and promotion of the arts in Singapore which today are, arguably, at a feverish pitch. Informed by myths and fantasies of artists in their studios, the work takes a speculative leap into the utopian and the absurd.

Launch and Artist Talk
Saturday, 17 March 2018
2.00 – 3.00pm
The Single Screen, Block 43 Malan Road
Part of Gillman Barracks’ Art Day Out! x Singapore Design Week 2018.

Creatif Compleks is on view in The Vitrine until 17 June 2018. 

 

Screening Series: Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention
1 May 2018, Tue - 24 Jun 2018, Sun

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Inspired by Tarek Atoui’s current exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea at NTU CCA Singapore, this screening series features artist videos, documentaries, and filmic essays that examine how the image and the sonic create immersive ways for multiple sensorial elements to come together and form a singular space. Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention is further guided by the Centre’s overarching research topic CLIMATES. HABITATS. ENVIRONMENTS. by focusing on artistic interpretations that reflect our present-day ecology, bringing attention to global issues we tend to overlook, and by observing how we navigate different environments, particularly through aural perception.

The screening series features works by Robert Ashley (United States), Lawrence Abu Hamdan (Jordan/Lebanon), Melanie Bonajo (Netherlands/United States), Camille Henrot (France/United States), Alison O’Daniel (United States), Uriel Orlow (Switzerland/United Kingdom), Simon Ripoll-Hurier (France), Ben Russell (United States), and Nico Vascellari (Italy). 

Each work will be shown for a week and looped during the exhibition’s opening hours.
A selection of works will be presented in a one-night-only screening on Friday, 8 June 2018.

 

 

SCHEDULE

Tuesday, 1 May – Sunday, 6 May
Title Withdrawn
Robert Ashley, 1976, 48 min

Title Withdrawn, a music theatre on videotape, belongs to a series of videos, Music with Roots in the Aether, directed by Robert Ashley, in which he establishes a panorama of the New York experimental scene of the early 1970s through interviews and concerts by composers Pauline Oliveros, Philip Glass, and Alvin Lucier. Based on his piece Automatic Writing, Ashley uses his own involuntary speech that results from his mild form of Tourette’s syndrome as one of the voices in the music. The second voice is a French translation of his ideas. Intrigued by his involuntary speech and the idea of an unconsciously-created music composition, Ashley’s interest in using voice and words went beyond their explicit denotation as he believed their rhythm and inflection could convey meaning even if one does not understand the actual phonemes.

Robert Ashley (United States, 1930–2014), one of the leading American composers of the post-Cage generation, is particularly known for his work in new forms of opera. In the 1960s, during his tenure as its director, the ONCE Festival in Ann Arbor presented most of the decade’s pioneers of the performing arts. With the legendary ONCE Group, he developed his first large-scale operas. Along with Alvin Lucier, Gordon Mumma, and David Behrman, he formed the Sonic Arts Union, a group that turned conceptualism toward electronics. Throughout the 1970s, he directed the Center for Contemporary Music at Mills College, and produced his first opera for television, the 14-hour Music with Roots in the Aether, based on the work and ideas of seven influential American composers. In the early 1980s the Kitchen commissioned Ashley’s Perfect Lives, the opera for television that is widely considered the precursor of “music-television.” Stage versions of Perfect Lives, as well as his following operas, Atalanta (Acts of God), Improvement (Don Leaves Linda), Foreign Experiences, eL/Aficionado and Now Eleanor’s Idea toured throughout the US and Canada, Europe and Asia during the 1980s and 1990s. A new group of operas was begun in 1999 when Kanagawa Arts Foundation (Japan) commissioned Dust, which was quickly followed by Celestial Excursions and The Old Man Lives in Concrete. He wrote and recorded his performance-novel, Quicksand (released in novel form by Burning Books). His final opera, Crash, was completed in December 2013 and premiered at the 2014 Whitney Biennial Exhibition.

 

Tuesday, 8 May – Sunday, 13 May
Rubber Coated Steel
Lawrence Abu Hamdan, 2016, 21 min

In May 2014, Israeli soldiers in the occupied West Bank (Palestine) shot and killed two teenagers, Nadeem Nawara and Mohamad Abu Daher. The human rights organisation Defence for Children International contacted Forensic Architecture, a Goldsmiths College-based agency that undertakes advanced architectural and media research, and worked with Lawrence Abu Hamdan to investigate the incident. The case hinged upon an audio-ballistic analysis of the recorded gunshots to determine whether the soldiers had used rubber bullets, as they asserted, or broken the law by firing live ammunition at the two unarmed teenagers. A little over a year after Abu Hamdan completed his report, he returns to the case of Abu Daher and Nawara in his video Rubber Coated Steel, which acts as a tribunal for the sounds extracted from the serial killings. It does not preside over the voices of the victims but rather seeks to amplify their silence, fundamentally questioning the ways in which rights are being heard today.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan (Jordan/Lebanon) is an artist and audio investigator currently a guest of German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Berlin. His interest with sound and its intersection with politics originate from his background as a touring musician and facilitator of DIY music. The artist’s audio investigations have been used as evidence at the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal in the United Kingdom, and as advocacy for organisations such as Amnesty International and Defence for Children International. They are conducted as part of his research for Forensic Architecture at Goldsmiths College London where he received his PhD in 2017. He was the recipient of the Abraaj group art prize (2018); the short film award at the Rotterdam International Film festival (2017) with Rubber Coated Steel; and Nam June Paik Award (2016) with his exhibition Earshot at Portikus Frankfurt. Solo exhibitions include Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Kunsthalle St Gallen (2015); The Showroom, London (2012); and Casco, Utrecht (2012). He is the author of [inaudible]: A Politics of Listening in 4 Acts (2016) and a forthcoming ebook produced as part of his 2015­–17 fellowship at the Vera List Centre for Art and Politics at the New School in New York. His works are part of collections at MoMA, New York; Guggenheim, New York; Van AbbeMuseum, Eindhoven; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and Tate Modern, London. 

 

Tuesday, 15 May – Sunday, 20 May
Remnants of the Future
Uriel Orlow, 2010/2012, 17 min 18 sec

Remnants of the Future combines elements of documentary, sci-fi, and electroacoustics. It portrays the precarious existence in a post-Soviet ghost town, an inverted ruin of the modern that is still waiting to fulfil its utopian ambition of communal living. It is set in Northern Armenia in a vast, unfinished housing project called Mush, named after the once flourishing Armenian town in Eastern Turkey. It was built on the orders of then Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to house the people displaced by the 1988 Armenian earthquake (also known as Spitak earthquake). The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 abruptly halted the ambitious housing development and it has since remained in a ghostly state of incompletion and near desertion, inhabited only by migrating birds and isolated human scavengers who salvage scrap metal out of the hollow shells of concrete and live in parts of the big, skeletal housing blocks. As the day turns into night, the soundscape, composed by Mikhail Karikis, moves from the sounds of animals and everyday activities of the few inhabitants to modulations of radio waves emitted by pulsars, or dying stars, which still reach us after the star has died. Out of this electroacoustic cloud, a woman’s voice announces: “I am an emissary from the future…” The time travelling character from Vladimir Mayakovsky’s play The Bathhouse (1930) invites those left behind by failed state capitalism and the neglect of free markets to join her in the commune of the future.

Uriel Orlow (Switzerland/United Kingdom) is concerned with spatial manifestations of memory, blind spots of representation and forms of haunting. His practice is research-based, process-oriented, and multi-disciplinary including film, photography, drawing, and sound. He is known for single-screen film works, lecture performances, and modular, multi-media installations that focus on specific locations and micro-histories, bringing different image-regimes and narrative modes into correspondence. In 2017 he was awarded the Sharjah Biennial prize. His work is presented widely in museums, film festivals, and international survey shows including the 2nd Yinchuan Biennial (2018); Sharjah Biennial 13 (2017); 2nd Aichi Triennale, Nagoya (2013); and 54th Venice Biennale (2011). Recent solo exhibitions include Kunsthalle St Gallen (2018); The Showroom, London (2016); and Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2015).

 

Tuesday, 22 May – Sunday, 27 May 2018
PONCE DE LEÓN
Ben Russell (co-directed with Jim Drain), 2012, 26 min

 “I could do wonders if I didn’t have a body. But the body grabs me, it slows me, it enslaves me.”
– Ponce de Léon

Ponce de León discovered the fountain of youth and drank of immortality in the waning moments of his life. In an instant, he became old forever—an 80-year-old Spaniard who would continue to walk the earth for centuries, watching as coral foundations gave way to mangrove swamps, as swamps were drained and buildings were erected, as buildings decayed and swamps returned. Ponce de León is an immortal for whom time poses the greatest dilemma—it is a constant, a given, and his personal battle lies in trying to either arrest time entirely or to make the hands on his clock move faster. For Ponce de León, time is a problem of body, and only by escaping his container can he escape time itself.

Ben Russell (United States) is a filmmaker, artist, and curator, who challenges conventions of documentary representation from within to produce intense, hypnotic, and, at times, hallucinating experiences. His curatorial work follows his filmmaking, which unfolds between experimental cinema and a form of speculative ethnography; he calls it “psychedelic ethnography.” His films and installations are in direct contact with the history of the documentary, providing a time-based inquiry into trance phenomena and evoking the research of other filmmakers including Jean Rouch, Maya Deren, and Michael Snow. Russell received a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship, and a FIPRESCI International Critics Prize (IFFR 2009) for his first feature film Let’s Go One Where He Goes. His second feature film, A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness, and Hallucinations, co-directed with Ben Rivers, premiered at the Locarno International Film Festival in 2013.

Courtesy of Video Data Bank at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, www.vdb.org

 

Tuesday, 29 May – Sunday, 3 June 2018
The Tuba Thieves Scene 55: The Plants Are Protected
Alison O’Daniel, 2013, 21 min

Over the past few years, tubas have been stolen from high schools all over the Los Angeles area to be sold on the black market for a high price. The Tuba Thieves respond to these thefts as a springboard for exploring the material and aural space of cinema through collaborations with hearing, deaf, and hard-of-hearing artists and musicians. Interpreting poems, artworks, news stories, and other references about the tuba thefts, deaf artist Christine Sun Kim created a musical score for The Tuba Thieves Scene 55. Alison O’Daniel’s approach reversed the usual filmmaking process by starting with the music, which then informed the other cinematographic decisions (film plot, settings, images, and atmosphere). A process of deep listening orchestrates the narrative, which involves different historical or anecdotal events that have incorporated deaf history, silence, or altered experiences of listening. Six short film segments of The Tuba Thieves, made between 2013 and 2015, are completed, and each iteration influences the next.

Alison O’Daniel’s (United States) work weaves narratives of aural sensitivity and experience between the mediums of film, object making, and performance. Through her collaborations with deaf and hearing composers and artists, her work invites sensitivity to the loss and abundance of sound and its impact on social situations. She has been featured in solo exhibitions at Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles (2013), and the Centre d’Art Contemporain Passerelle, Brest (2015). O’Daniel’s feature-length film Night Sky premiered at the Anthology Film Archive in conjunction with Performa 11 as part of the Walking Forward-Running Past show at Art in General, and has been presented with live musical or Sign Language accompaniment at venues including The Aspen Museum of Art; MOCAD (Detroit); NYU; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Museum of Jurassic Technology; and High Desert Test Sites.

  

Tuesday, 5 June – Sunday, 10 June 2018
Untitled Song
Nico Vascellari, 2004, 2 min 57 sec

The camera follows a drum set while it rolls down a steep hill in the woods. During the drum’s seemingly endless journey, it gets hit by trees, rocks, and bushes, creating a live performance that the artist registers closely. The linear simplicity of the film is disturbed by the inversion of the movement between player and instrument: The drum set comes to the players by chance, instead of the players intending to hit the drums. From time to time, the viewer can hear the invisible composer become part of the concert through his breathing, making himself present in the form of sound. Avoiding a direct relationship between sound and image, Nico Vascellari makes the importance of the former over the latter evident and maintains the anticipation of the unpredictable next moment of this sonic experiment.

Nico Vascellari (Italy) is a multifaceted artist who communicates mainly through performance, video, and installations. His work is presented widely in museums, and international survey shows including Manifesta7 Rovereto (2008), 15th Quadriennale di Roma (2008), and 52nd Venice Biennale (2007). He has had solo exhibitions at MAXXI, Museo delle Arti del XXI secolo, Rome (2018); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2017); Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester (2016); and Villa Medici, Rome (2016); and has been part of group shows at Museion, Bolzano (2016); Museo Del Novecento, Milan (2016); National Art Gallery, Tirana (2015); and Fondation Beyeler, Basel (2014).

 

Tuesday, 12 June – Sunday, 17 June 2018
Losing the Birds
Simon Ripoll-Hurier, 2015, 17 min

In Losing the Birds, Kenneth Ward (president of the North Alabama Birdwatching Society) and his wife Rufina are shown in their garden in Huntsville, Alabama, constantly switching between attempts to communicate with the birds around them, chatting to each other, and voicing their ecological concerns about the future of local species. Birdwatchers or “birders” spend their free-time trying to observe birds. They position themselves in a strategic place, in the forest or at the edge of a forest, and wait. They are equipped with binoculars and a list of bird species found in the area. Each time they see (or hear) a particular species, they tick it off the list. To improve their results, they practice “pishing,” which involves imitating certain bird calls (mainly those of predators such as the Scops owl in the American East) to trigger reactions among smaller birds, who will give their alarm call and start to move, making them easier to spot.

Simon Ripoll-Hurier (France) is a visual artist and musician. Covering several intersecting fields, his work initially focused on venues for the production of dominant images, such as Hollywood (Translations, 2008–11) and Broadway (The Broadway Melody, 2010–13), using translation and transposition mechanisms as procedures for borrowing and subversion. In 2013 he made the experimental film Dreamland, which documents the process of fabricating a song. He then became more involved with movies and has been working on his Diana project since 2014, of which Losing the Bird is part of and consists of videos performance and a radio piece. His work has been shown in numerous institutions including Le Magasin, Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales, Palais de Tokyo, Fondation des Galeries Lafayette; and has been acquired by public art collections, among them the Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Frac Haute-Normandie, Beaux-arts de Paris, and the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales. He also plays with les Agamemnonz, an instrumental surf music band, and is the co-founder of the online artists’ radio station *DUUU.

 

Tuesday, 19 June – Sunday, 24 June 2018
Grosse Fatigue
Camille Henrot, 2013, 13 min

With Grosse Fatigue, Camille Henrot set herself the challenge of telling the story of the universe’s creation. The backbone of Grosse Fatigue is a long poem delivered in the style of spoken word, the form of expression used to great effect in the 1970s by the New York musicians, The Last Poets. It mixes scientific history with creation stories belonging to religious (Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, etc.), hermetic (Kabbalah, Freemasonry, etc.), and oral (Dogon, Inuit, Navajo, etc.) traditions in a joyous syncretism. In the visual background of this impassioned oration, Henrot performs what she calls an “intuitive unfolding of knowledge” through a series of shots unveiling the treasures hidden away in the prestigious collections of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.—shots that have been reworked with images found on the Internet and scenes filmed in locations as diverse as a pet store and a domestic interior that appear like pop-ups at the screen’s surface.

Camille Henrot’s (France/United States) diverse practice combines film, drawing, and sculpture. Taking inspiration from subjects as varied as literature, mythology, cinema, anthropology, evolutionary biology, religion, and the banality of everyday life, Henrot’s work acutely reconsiders the typologies of objects and established systems of knowledge. A 2013 artistic fellowship at the Smithsonian resulted in her film Grosse Fatigue, for which she was awarded the Silver Lion at the 55th Venice Biennale awarding the “most promising young artist.” Henrot is the recipient of the 2014 Nam Jun Paik Award and the Edvard Munch Art Award 2015. She has had solo exhibitions at the New Museum, New York; Schinkel Pavilion, Berlin; New Orleans Museum of Art; and Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris. Her work has been included in group shows at MoMA, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and SculptureCenter, New York; as well as the 2015 Lyon Biennial, and the 2016 Berlin Biennial.

 

Image credit: Camille Henrot, Grosse Fatigue, 2013, film still. Courtesy the artist.

Carte Blanche #1, #2 and #3
4 May 2018, Fri 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM
1 Jun 2018, Fri 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM
23 Jun 2018, Sat 06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Friday, 4 May, 7.30 – 9.00pm
Carte Blanche #1
Dharma, Bani Haykal, Wu Jun Han, and Yuen Chee Wai

Friday, 1 June 2018, 7.30 – 9.00pm
Carte Blanche #2
Tini Aliman, Cheryl Ong, The Analog Girl, and Vivian Wang

Saturday, 23 June 2018, 6.00 – 7.00pm
Carte Blanche #3
Tini Aliman, Dharma, Sudarshan Chandra Kumar, Cheryl Ong, Zai Tang, Wu Jun Han, and Yuen Chee Wai 

Part of Art Day Out! x The School Holidays Edition 2018 at Gillman Barracks

 

Derived from the sonic exchanges that will take place throughout the course of the exhibition between Tarek Atoui’s guest hosts—Vivian Wang, Mark Wong, and Yuen Chee Wai—this series of performative situations are conceptualised as an open invitation for other invited performers to use the exhibition space as an experimental platform. Each of the evenings will be the result of an exchange between the performers and the three guest hosts.

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Dharma (Singapore) experiments with electric guitar, incorporating effects and objects together with various extended techniques. After seven albums with avant-rock band The Observatory, Dharma’s solo debut in 2013, Intergranular Space, opened up new vistas for his guitar work. He has been involved in various experimental and improvised music performances most notably at the Asian Meeting Festival 2016, which featured notable Asian improvisers like Otomo Yoshihide and Jojo Hiroshige. 

Bani Haykal (Singapore) is an artist, composer, and musician. Haykal considers music (making/process) as a metaphor for cybernetics. His projects revolve around interfacing and interaction in feedback/feedforward mechanisms. An artist-in-residence at NTU CCA Singapore (2015), he is a member of b-quartet and Soundpainting ensemble Erik Satay & The Kampong Arkestra.

Wu Jun Han (Singapore) creates and performs in the audio-visual, and has a background in video art. Through an interdisciplinary approach to performance, he explores the visceral, materiality, vernacular practices, and the future. For State of Motion 2018, he presented a sound work in response to Shaw Brothers films 1950–70s from Singapore. He was an artist-in-residence in Pulau Ubin, organised by The Artists Village, where he installed a makeshift photography lab (2012).

Yuen Chee Wai (Singapore) is a musician, artist, designer, and curator. He is a founding member of FEN (Far East Network) and Project Director of the Asian Music Network, where he co-curates the annual Asian Meeting Festival in Japan. He is a member of the avant-rock band The Observatory, where he plays guitar, synth, and electronics.

Tini Aliman (Singapore) is a sound designer, artist, audio editor, and field recordist. She was the sound designer for Geng Rebut Cabinet by Alfian Saat, part of W!ld Rice (2016), and Charged by Chong Tze Chien, Singapore Theatre Festival (2011). Most recently, she designed the sound for Angkat, a production from Teater Ekamatra’s Artist Residency Programme, which was nominated Best Sound Design for Life! Theatre Awards 2018. 

Cheryl Ong (Singapore) is a percussionist active in music performance and education, regularly performing with avant-rock group The Observatory and SA, a trio that uses traditional Chinese instruments with modern sensibilities. A recipient of the National Arts Council Arts Bursary (Overseas), Ong graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing, with a degree in Chinese Percussion. Though classically trained, Ong consistently struggles with the division of classical and traditional music and the limits of their roles.

The Analog Girl (Singapore) started out as a lo-fi bedroom project using portable synthesisers and cassette tape recorders, having evolved into a universe of dreamlike technicolour pop. She creates and performs using a myriad of illuminating electronic instruments including the Tenori-On, Monome, and Percussa AudioCubes. She has been named by TIME magazine as one of 5 Music Acts To Watch in 2008.

Vivian Wang (Singapore) diverged from her formal training as a classical pianist when she started the avant rock outfit The Observatory in 2001. A former TV producer-presenter as well as a film music supervisor, Wang focuses solely on music, performance, and interdisciplinary work since 2008. She performs on synth, keyboard, voice, and percussion, and tags Alice Coltrane, Robert Wyatt, Mark Hollis, Bill Evans, and Annapurna Devi as her all-time favourite musical heroes.

Sudarshan Chandra Kumar (Malaysia) has performed for the Asian Meeting Festival (Singapore); CHOPPA Music Fest (Singapore); Playfreely (Singapore); KLEX Festival (Malaysia); and Switch On Festival (Malaysia). He participates regularly in Serious Play Improv Lab (SPIL), a monthly experimental music series in Kuala Lumpur. Together with Yong Yandsen and Tey Beng Tze, he established LaoBan Records in 2017, which released its first album clinamina for His Hubris, a duo by Sudarshan and Yong.

Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore) experiments with the abstraction and visualisation of field recordings from natural environments, combining these sonorities with drawing, animation, projection, and performance to create immersive and reflexive experiences. He presented solo and collaborative work at Singapore International Festival of the Arts (2017); National Gallery Singapore (2017); Esplanade’s da:ns Festival (2016/2013); IFA Gallery Berlin/ Stuttgart (2015); the 56th and 52nd Venice Biennale (2015 and 2007), in collaboration Charles Lim and Tang Da Wu respectively, among others.

Mark Wong (Singapore) has been active in experimental music, sonic arts and independent music practice in the last decade, playing multiple roles as organiser, programmer, artist, curator, writer, and label producer. His sound compositions, site-specific works, sound walks, sound objects, and multi-channel installations have been exhibited at Singapore Art Museum, 8Q@SAM, Institute of Contemporary Arts Singapore, Jendela (Visual Arts Space), and Yavuz Gallery. In 2010, Wong conceived Ujikaji as a music label and event organiser with a focus on experimental music in Singapore and Southeast Asia. 

Image credit: Tarek Atoui, The Ground, 30 September – 15 December 2017, Mirrored Gardens, installation view. Courtesy Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou.

The Public Studio: Exploring Autogenous Culture through Participatory Art Practices workshop with Dr Felicia Low (Singapore), artist and Director, Community Cultural Development
6 Jun 2018, Wed 07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

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This workshop by Dr Felicia Low presents the concept of autogenous cultural practices, which are defined by life practices that neither rely on nor protest the influence of the state on the site of the body and everyday life. Low also proposes for autogenous cultural practices which establish their own forms of life and measures of value that are in no way dictated by predetermined institutional forms of social life and engagement. To illustrate this proposal, Low will draw upon references from her publication Autogenous Culture As Political Form (2016) as well as an auto-ethnographical account of three participatory art projects — first, a project with the incarcerated in a governmental disciplinary centre; second, Project X, a non-governmental organisation that supports sex workers; and lastly, an independent art project with three young women.

The second part of the workshop will culminate in a conversation between the artist, the Centre’s Young Professional Trainees (YPT) who are the curators of this project, as well as the public. The conversation will trace the connections between Low’s practice and other educational projects through a selection of materials from the NTU CCA Singapore’s Public Resource Platform.

 

Please register for the workshop here: https://peatix.com/event/390204/view

*This workshop is a public programme of the current research project Public Resource Platform: We Are Open! in The Lab.

 

Special Screening: Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention
8 Jun 2018, Fri 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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Inspired by Tarek Atoui’s current exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea at NTU CCA Singapore, this screening series features artist videos, documentaries, and filmic essays that examine how the image and the sonic create immersive ways for multiple sensorial elements to come together and form a singular space. Maybe I hadn’t been paying attention is further guided by the Centre’s overarching research topic CLIMATES. HABITATS. ENVIRONMENTS. by focusing on artistic interpretations that reflect our present-day ecology, bringing attention to global issues we tend to overlook, and by observing how we navigate different environments, particularly through aural perception.

 

SELECTIONS

Night Soil — Nocturnal Gardening
Melanie Bonajo, 2016, 49 min 47 sec

Nocturnal Gardening portrays a group of women living by alternative norms who have each, on their own, established communities. The women stand for sensitivity, connection, and communication with other communities, plants, animals, and elements. They attune their energy to the ecosystem around them with an enhanced sensibility. They are friends with the Earth and dependent members of the community of Nature. They explore new ways of togetherness and do so in a pragmatic, personal way. This film is a conversion of human psychic content into an imagery that enhances our moral landscape for our own decision making, in terms of ecology and interdependent values, as well as in the care for ourselves, our neighbours, and our earth.

Melanie Bonajo’s (Netherlands/United States) work examines the paradoxes inherent to ideas of comfort with a strong sense for community, equality, and body‐politics. Through her videos, performances, photographs, and installations, she studies subjects related to how technological advances and commodity-based pleasures increase feelings of alienation, removing a sense of belonging in an individual. Captivated by concepts of the divine, Bonajo explores the spiritual emptiness of her generation, examines peoples’ shifting relationship with nature and tries to understand existential questions by reflecting on our domestic situation, ideas around classification, concepts of home, gender, and attitudes towards value.

 

Sounds from Beneath 
Mikhail Karikis & Uriel Orlow, 2010–11, 6 min 41 sec

In Sounds from Beneath, a desolate disused colliery in East Kent, once populated with workers, machines, and the sounds of their activities, is brought back to life through song. The video centres around a choral piece for which Mikhail Karikis invites an ex-miners’ choir to recall and sing the subterranean sounds of a working coal mine. It transforms into an amphitheatre resonating sounds of explosions in the ground, machines cutting the coal-face, shovels scratching the earth, and the distant melody of the Miner’s Lament, all sung by Snowdown Colliery Welfare Male Voice Choir grouping in formations reminiscent of picket lines.

Mikhail Karikis (Greece/United Kingdom) has a background in art, architecture, and music, and often collaborates with communities to create projects that highlight alternative modes of human existence, solidarity, and action. His work is exhibited widely in museums and international biennials including Kochi-Muziris Biennale (2016); British Art Show 8 (2015–17); Steirischer Herbst (2015); 19th Biennale of Sydney (2014); Mediacity Seoul/SeMA Biennale (2014). Recent solo exhibitions include The Chalk Factory, Aarhus European Capital of Culture 2017, and Love Is the Institution of Revolution, Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art Contemporain (2017).

Uriel Orlow (Switzerland/United Kingdom) is concerned with spatial manifestations of memory, blind spots of representation and forms of haunting. His practice is research-based, process-oriented, and multi-disciplinary including film, photography, drawing, and sound. He is known for single-screen film works, lecture performances, and modular, multi-media installations that focus on specific locations and micro-histories, bringing different image-regimes and narrative modes into correspondence. In 2017 he was awarded the Sharjah Biennial prize. His work is presented widely in museums, film festivals, and international survey shows including the 2nd Yinchuan Biennial (2018); Sharjah Biennial 13 (2017); 2nd Aichi Triennale, Nagoya (2013); and 54th Venice Biennale (2011). Recent solo exhibitions include Kunsthalle St Gallen (2018); The Showroom, London (2016); and Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2015).

 

Image credit: Mikhail Karikis and Uriel Orlow, Sounds from Beneath, 2010, film still. Courtesy the artists.

The Public Studio: Dirty Laundry workshop with Ang Song Nian (Singapore), artist and Lecturer, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU
20 Jun 2018, Wed 06:00 PM - 09:00 PM

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In this iteration of THEBOOKSHOW’s Dirty Laundry project, artist and lecturer Ang Song Nian will guide participants through a hands-on examination into the bad and the ugly in photography. The workshop will explore what makes a photograph “good” or “bad” and further develop this ongoing conversation among image makers, tastemakers, and the audience.

Participants are invited to bring their own images to the workshop. Working with their own images, as well as materials from the Public Resource Platform, participants will serve as contributors and editors to create a unique copy of their very own Dirty Laundry photo zine.

What to bring?

At least 15 – 20 “bad” images that are printed on any form of paper material between the sizes 148mm – 297mm (length or height)

Images are required to be owned by the participant to avoid copyright infringements.

 

Please register for the workshop here: https://peatix.com/event/390220

*This workshop is a public programme of the current research project Public Resource Platform: We Are Open! in The Lab.

Culture City. Culture Scape.
Guided Tour at Mapletree Business City II
23 Jun 2018, Sat 05:00 PM - 05:45 PM

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Meeting point: Block 43 Malan Road

Explore the new art installations nestled in the lush compound of Mapletree Business City II (MBC II). Themed Culture City. Culture Scape., this public art project, commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore comprises of works by internationally renowned artists Dan Graham (United States), Zulkifle Mahmod (Singapore), Tomás Saraceno (Argentina/Germany), and Yinka Shonibare (Nigeria/United Kingdom).

Inspired by the idea of expanded sculptural environments, the artworks explore the interplay between landscape, architecture, and the broader social and economic environments they are placed in. More than being monumental or site-specific, each work alters or permeates its local context to invite visitors to a broader, richer engagement.

Culture City. Culture Scape. is a unique collaboration between Mapletree Investments and NTU CCA Singapore.

To register or for further queries, please email ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg.

 

Image credit: Dan Graham, Elliptical Pavillion, 2017, glass and mirror pavilion at Mapletree Business City II. Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore.

Art Day Out! x The School Holidays Edition 2018
23 Jun 2018, Sat 02:00 PM - 08:00 PM

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Join us on Saturday, 23 June as we present an exciting array of events as part of Art Day Out! x The School Holidays Edition 2018 at Gillman Barracks! Events happening that day include open studios, where you can meet current Artists-in-Residence; a workshop by artist and illustrator Tan Zi Xi, on how we can visualise sounds; and tours of our current exhibition, The Ground: From the Land to the Sea by Tarek Atoui, and of public art installations in Mapletree Business City II commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore.

We look forward to seeing you then!

Residencies OPEN
2.00 – 7.00pm | Blocks 37 and 38 Malan Road

Residencies OPEN offers a rare insight into the often-introverted sphere of the artist studios. Through showcasing discussions, performances, installations, and works-in-progress, Residencies OPEN profiles the diversity of contemporary art practice from around the globe and the divergent ways artists conceive an artwork with the studio as a constant space for experimentation and research.

Come meet our current Artists-in-Residence in their studios! Featuring Viet Lê (Vietnam/United States), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), Luca Lum (Singapore), Phyoe Kyi (Myanmar), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), and Susie Wong (Singapore).

More details here: http://ntu.ccasingapore.org/events/residencies-open/

Workshop: Making Sense by artist and illustrator Tan Zi Xi (Singapore)
2.00 – 6.00pm | The Seminar Room, Block 43 Malan Road

*Developed for participants aged 13 and above.

How does one visualise something intangible like sound? Meditating on sounds from the exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea by Tarek Atoui, this workshop will explore how to express sound through image making.

To register for the workshop, please email: ntuccaeducation@ntu.edu.sg

More details here: http://ntu.ccasingapore.org/events/making-sense-artist-illustrator-tan-zi-xi-singapore/

Exhibition Tour: Tarek Atoui – The Ground: From the Land to the Sea
2.00 – 2.45pm | The Exhibition Hall, Block 43 Malan Road

Sound artist and composer Tarek Atoui’s (Lebanon/France) first solo exhibition in Southeast Asia is conceived as a musical composition that unfolds in space through its unique sound library and instruments. The sounds are from underwater environments, as well as human and industrial activities in the harbours of Athens and Abu Dhabi, recorded for the project I/E (2015–ongoing). As part of the current exhibition, Atoui recorded with composer and sound artist Éric La Casa at various waterfront sites and islands in Singapore including the Jurong Fishery Port, Pulau Sebarok (an oil storage facility and refuelling port off the Southern coastline), and on an oil tanker. Using devices such as a hydrophone, contact microphones, and self-made omnidirectional microphones, the duo captured acoustic features that attempt to understand and analyse characteristics of sonic environments. Atoui’s auditory library is an artistic interpretation of the ecology of our times that when presented in the exhibition space, transposes the audience into an immersive audio-visual topography.

More details here: http://ntu.ccasingapore.org/exhibitions/the-ground/

To register or for further queries, please email: ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg

Guided Tour: Culture City. Culture Scape. at Mapletree Business City II
5.00 – 5.45pm | Block 43 Malan Road (Meeting point)

Explore the art installations nestled in the lush compound of Mapletree Business City II (MBC II). Themed Culture City. Culture Scape., this public art project, commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore comprises of works by internationally renowned artists Dan Graham (United States), Zulkifle Mahmod (Singapore), Tomás Saraceno (Argentina/Germany), and Yinka Shonibare (Nigeria/United Kingdom).

Inspired by the idea of expanded sculptural environments, the artworks explore the interplay between landscape, architecture, and the broader social and economic environments they are placed in. More than being monumental or site-specific, each work alters or permeates its local context to invite visitors to a broader, richer engagement.

Culture City. Culture Scape. is a unique collaboration between Mapletree Investments and NTU CCA Singapore.

To register or for further queries, please email: ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg

Performance: Carte Blanche #3
6.00 – 8.00pm | The Exhibition Hall, Block 43 Malan Road

Featuring musicians Tini Aliman (Singapore), Dharma (Singapore), Sudarshan Chandra Kumar (Malaysia), Cheryl Ong (Singapore), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), Wu Jun Han (Singapore), and Yuen Chee Wai (Singapore)

Part of the public programme for Tarek Atoui – The Ground: From the Land to the Sea

Derived from sonic exchanges taking place throughout the course of the exhibition between Tarek Atoui’s guest hosts—Vivian Wang, Mark Wong, and Yuen Chee WaiCarte Blanche #3 is the last of a series of performative situations that invites the audience to experience the exhibition space as an experimental platform.

More details here: http://ntu.ccasingapore.org/events/carte-blanche-1-2-3/

 

Image credit: Art Day Out!, November 2016.

Making Sense workshop by artist and illustrator Tan Zi Xi (Singapore)
23 Jun 2018, Sat 02:00 PM - 06:00 PM

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On the occasion of Gillman Barracks Art Day Out! x The School Holidays

*Developed for participants aged 13 and above.

Participants are invited to meditate on the sounds from the exhibition The Ground: From the Land to the Sea composed by artist and musician Tarek Atoui. The workshop will explore several aspects of image making, from abstract to narrative, engaging closely with the idea of developing stories that sounds can tell. The participants will visually translate these sonorities through the question, “How does something intangible like sound look?”

Please register at: http://makingsense.peatix.com

Residencies OPEN
23 Jun 2018, Sat 02:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Residencies OPEN offers a rare insight into the often-introverted sphere of the artist studios. Through showcasing discussions, performances, installations, and works-in-progress, Residencies OPEN profiles the diversity of contemporary art practice from around the globe and the divergent ways artists conceive an artwork with the studio as a constant space for experimentation and research.

Come meet our current Artists-in-Residence in their studios! Featuring Viet Lê (Vietnam/United States), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), Luca Lum (Singapore), Phyoe Kyi (Myanmar), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), and Susie Wong (Singapore).

Singapore Art Book Fair 2018
29 Jun 2018, Fri - 1 Jul 2018, Sun 12:00 PM - 08:00 PM

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Visit us at Booth 39B!

Singapore Art Book Fair (SGABF) is an independent annual multi-day festival specialising in contemporary art books & zines. Free and open to the public, SGABF features art books, art catalogues, monographs, zines, and printed ephemera. Over the course of the weekend, the fair will be complemented by a range of art-related fringe activities.

PUBLISHING AS DISCOURSE is the title of the programme for Singapore Art Book Fair 2018, curated by NTU CCA Singapore, that explores the media of publishing as a discursive space. This series of conversations and presentations brings together international publishers, writers and scholars, curators and artists who use the field of publishing as a critical form to engage with the arts.

Singapore Art Book Fair 2018 will be held in The Exhibition Hall, Block 43 Malan Road, Gillman Barracks, and all public programmes will take place in The Single Screen, Block 43 Malan Road, unless otherwise stated. Publications by NTU CCA Singapore will be available for purchase at Booth 39B.

FRIDAY, 29 JUNE 2018

4.00 – 5.00pm
Publishing Artists’ Books – Artist Trade Book

In Spring 2017, eight Asian recipients of the Steidl Book Award were invited to make their books in Göttingen, Germany. Among them were Singaporean artists Broy Lim and Woong Soak Teng. With each concept, the artists translated their ideas and work into a book form, crafting, and refining stories and visuals into book objects. This conversation will share the process, challenges, and constraints the artists had in order to arrive at the book they called their own. 

Speakers:
Broy Lim (Singapore), artist
Woong Soak Teng (Singapore), artist
Moderated by Gwen Lee (Singapore), Co-founder and Director, Singapore International Photography Festival and DECK gallery

6.00 – 7.30pm
Publishing Complexes

This session discusses some of the strategies art magazine publishers adopt to present a comprehensible outlook of current developments in contemporary art, as well as evaluates the magazine’s role in generating discourse in the arts. Magazine publishers have grown beyond producing conventional printed series to delving into, not only digital platforms, but also activities such as exhibition making, fair and festival initiatives, education programmes, and other forms of artistic production while maintaining their core business in publishing.

Speakers:
Kaye Cain-Nielsen (United States), Editor-in-Chief, e-flux journal
Chloe Chu (Hong Kong), Associate Editor, ArtAsiaPacific
Robin Peckham (United States/China), Editor-in-Chief, LEAP magazine
Mark Rappolt (United Kingdom), Editor-in-Chief, ArtReview and ArtReview Asia
Amy Sherlock (United Kingdom), Deputy Editor, frieze magazine
Moderated by Shabbir Hussain Mustafa, Senior Curator, National Gallery Singapore

 

SATURDAY, 30 JUNE 2018

1.30 – 5.00pm
Publishing Artists’ Books — Case Study Presentations

This event features case study presentations of artist-book projects selected by international and regional independent publishers. The speakers will introduce various collaborative projects between artists and publishers, providing insight into how artist books are conceptualised and how they develop into the final printed form.

Presenters:
1.30 – 2.30pm: Christophe Boutin (France), Co-founder, onestar press and Three Star Books
2.45 – 3.45pm: Shyue Woon (Singapore), artist and architect
4.00 – 5.00pm: Wei Guan (China), Co-founder, Bananafish Books and Art Director, Shanghai Art Book Fair

5.30 – 7.00pm
Publishing Geopolitics

A discussion about scholarly journals and their role in writing art histories. In conversation are editorial representative from established and relatively young journals with varied focus on regional or global discourses. This session will revolve around questions of the academic periodical as a discursive space for writing art histories as well as critically examine their geographical and conceptual markers.

Speakers:
Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez (Philippines), Editorial Board Member, Southeast of Now: Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia
Keith Wallace (Canada), Editor-in-Chief, Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art
Moderated by Peter Schoppert (Singapore), President, Singapore Book Publishers Association and Director, National University Singapore Press

 

SUNDAY, 1 JULY 2018

1.30 – 5.00pm
Publishing Artists’ Books — Case Study Presentations

This event features case study presentations of artist-book projects selected by international and regional independent publishers. The speakers will introduce various collaborative projects between artists and publishers, providing insight into how artist books are conceptualised and how they develop into the final printed form.

Presenters:
1.30 – 2.30pm: Ringo Bunoan (Philippines), artist and Co-founder, artbooks.ph
2.45 – 3.45pm: Beatrix Pang (Hong Kong), Founder, Small Tune Press
4.00 – 5.00pm: Savannah Gorton (Germany/Denmark), curator and Co-founder, Friends with Books

5.30 – 7.00pm
Publishing Independently

What is the potential of self-initiated publications as forms of artistic collaboration? What are the benefits and pitfalls of self-publishing versus traditional publishing and what do they contribute to the cultural field? This panel will explore recent developments in self-publishing, what necessitates these forms of independent production and how they contribute as platforms for distribution and for developing readership for the arts.

Speakers:
Ringo Bunoan (Philippines), artist and Co-founder, Art Book Philippines
Savannah Gorton (Germany/Denmark), curator and Co-founder, Friends with Books
Beatrix Pang (Hong Kong), Founder, Small Tune Press
Moderated by Shubigi Rao (India/Singapore), artist


Special Book Projects presented by Three Star Books (France)

At the invitation of NTU CCA Singapore, Three Star Books presents two projects from artists Gabriel Kuri (Mexico) and Jonathan Monk (United Kingdom/Germany) in the Exhibition Hall at Singapore Art Book Fair 2018:

Gabriel Kuri’s Reduce to Improper Fraction (2018) follows the artist’s interest in mathematical interpretations of the world, exploring the visual vocabulary used to teach children how to master the complex world of fractions employing coloured pages, die-cut shapes and graphic reproductions.

Jonathan Monk‘s 24 Dessins Isométriques (Afrique Cubique) (2017) combines ideas and forms while linking dates and locations; the artist knows that great art is sparked by the friction of two antagonistic elements, and this time Monk has decided to play with two of his favorite fetishes: African wax print and Sol Lewitt’s Isometric Drawings from 1982. The result is 24 isometric drawings by Sol Lewitt silk-screened upon a selection of African wax textiles that have been bound together as a typical textiles “sample book.” 

 

Three Star Books (France) is owned and managed by Christophe Boutin and Mélanie Scarciglia with Maddalena Quarta operating studio production. At Three Star, the term artist’s book is interpreted loosely and the production of works strive as both a challenge and foray into redefining what constitutes as “a page” within a “book.” Each publication begins and ends with the artist’s vision. Three Star Books works directly with the artist to conceive, experiment, and produce each fine-crafted edition.

 

 

Find out more about Singapore Art Book Fair 2018
http://www.singaporeartbookfair.org/

#SGABF2018 #ntuccasingapore

Public Resource Platform:
We Are Open!
8 May 2018, Tue - 8 Jul 2018, Sun

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We Are Open! brings the artists’ files of NTU CCA Singapore’s Public Resource Platform into the spotlight by reinterpreting The Lab, the Centre’s space for introducing research in process, as an open studio for activation. Each artist’s file contains materials ranging from books, collaterals, photographs, and videos to grey literature, donated to the Centre by the Artists-in-Residence, as well as Singaporean artists outside our Residency Programme.

Spanning eight weeks, this presentation by NTU CCA Singapore’s Young Professional Trainees takes the form of an ongoing experiment to explore the potential of these files as a tool for research and education, inviting the public to engage with materials for research, creation, and commentary about subjects such as culture, identity, and alternate realities. We Are Open! will also include collaborations with local artists who have been invited to utilise the diverse resource materials in the context of education workshops.

Curated by Young Professional Trainees:

Qamarul Asyraf, Productions
Ho Mun Yee, Research
Sara Ng, Residencies
Joey Sim, Residencies
Priscilla Toh, Communications
Olivia Wong, Exhibitions
Zhang Jing Chao, Outreach and Education

Image caption: Materials from NTU CCA Singapore’s artists’ files, 2018.

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMMES

The Public Studio

The Public Studio consists of two workshops in which the public will be able to work first-hand with invited local artists who are also educators in the arts field. Through these workshops, the public and artists will have the opportunity to generate tangible interpretations of the resources in the Public Resource Platform.

These collaborative discussions on contemporary subjects found in the artists’ files, aim to provide a better understanding of how the Public Resource Platform can be utilised beyond the intended context of curatorial research. Insights derived from these workshops will be exhibited on the walls throughout the course of the show as demonstrations of the experimental processes.

 

Wednesday, 6 June 2018, 7.00 — 9.00pm

The Public Studio: Exploring Autogenous Culture through Participatory Art Practices workshop with Dr Felicia Low (Singapore), artist and Director, Community Cultural Development

Wednesday, 20 June 2018, 6.00 — 9.00pm

The Public Studio: Dirty Laundry workshop with Ang Song Nian (Singapore), artist and Lecturer, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU