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NTU CCA Singapore Online Benefit Auction 2018
13 Sep 2018, Thu - 11 Oct 2018, Thu

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Click here to bid!

NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore is excited to present the second online benefit auction as part of its 5th Anniversary Celebration. Over 40 works have been generously donated by local and international artists who have collaborated with the Centre’s residencies or exhibition programmes since it opened in October 2013. All proceeds will go towards supporting the Centre’s future programming.

All of the auction lots are now available for viewing and bidding online at https://ntu.oph.hk and closes Thursday, 11 October 2018 at 10.00pm (GMT+8).

Donated artworks by Atif Akin (Turkey/United States), Laura Anderson Barbata (Mexico/United States), Martha Atienza (Philippines), Bui Cong Khanh (Vietnam), Kent Chan (Singapore), Tiffany Chung (Vietnam), Lucy Davis & Kee Ya Ting (United Kingdom & Singapore), Sam Durant (United States), Chia-Wei Hsu (Taiwan), Hu Yun (China), Oliver Husain (Canada), James Jack (United States/Singapore), Monica Ursina Jäger (Switzerland/United Kingdom), Joan Jonas (United States), Geraldine Kang (Singapore), Koh Nguang How (Singapore), Lim Sokchanlina (Cambodia), Alex Mawimbi (Kenya/United Kingdom), Manish Nai (India), Arjuna Neuman (Germany), Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyen (Canada/Sweden), UuDam Tran Nguyen (Vietnam), Jamie North (Australia), Lucy + Jorge Orta (United Kingdom & Argentina), Ulrike Ottinger (Germany), Gary-Ross Pastrana (Philippines), Matthias Sohr (Germany/Switzerland), Tan Pin Pin (Singapore), Erika Tan (Singapore/United Kingdom), Zai Tang (United Kingdom/Singapore), Sissel Tolaas (Norway/Germany), chi too (Malaysia), Mona Vatamanu and Florin Tudor (Romania/Switzerland), Jason Wee (Singapore), Entang Wiharso (Indonesia), and Haegue Yang (South Korea)

 

Thank you for your invaluable support!

From all of us at NTU CCA Singapore

Behind the Scenes: dancer and performer Maggie Segale, artist Cally Spooner, and artist and writer Jesper List Thomsen
2 Oct 2018, Tue 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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Choreographer and artist Cally Spooner shares her fascination with language, politics, and philosophy and how societies’ orders and regimes are reflected in her work. She will elaborate on how subjectivity and its bodies are shaped by technological and performative conditions, where language undergoes damage. Together with her collaborators Maggie Segale and Jesper List Thomsen, they will discuss OFFSHORE, a philosophy school for embodied knowledge, its diverse aspects, forms, and the concept of the laboratory.

Moderated by Magdalena Magiera, Curator, Outreach & Education, NTU CCA Singapore

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BIOGRAPHIES

Maggie Segale (United States) is a dancer, artist, and teacher with a focus on performing and interdisciplinary, collaborative work. She graduated from the Juilliard School, where she received multiple awards and fellowships including the 2014 Entrepreneurship Fellowship for her writing on self-image and dance. Segale works with Helen Simoneau Danse, Bryan Arias, and artist Cally Spooner, having collaborated with A24 Films, Center for Innovation in the Arts, Roya Carreras in the upcoming Pussy Riot music video, composer Zubin Hensler, and Matilda Sakamoto. Segale choreographed the opera Role of Reason at the Interarts Festival 2018, and was an Artist-in-Residence at the New Jersey Dance Theatre Ensemble (2016).

Cally Spooner’s (United Kingdom/Greece) spatialisations are continuously evolving in accordance to temporal contexts to render society’s orders and social regimes visible. Her projects look at “language-making” and alternative compositions of communication and movement in today’s context, where speech and attention are automated, the body is hired technology, and subjectivity and communication are consistently outsourced. Addressing the damage chrono-normativity can cause, she works with duration and rehearsals as alternative spaces. Appropriating and referencing genres such as the musical, the novel, or the radio play, Spooner builds a new sonic, literary, and living language to trigger public reaction towards the rapidly changing digital communication and how our understanding of the world changes along. Spooner’s work has been widely exhibited since 2008. Recent solo shows include Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève (2018); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2017); New Museum, New York (2016); and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2016). Recent group shows include Serpentine Gallery, London (2017) and the Geneva Moving Image Biennial (2016–17). Upcoming shows include Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2018); Swiss Institute, New York (2018); and Art Institute Chicago (2019). Spooner’s book Scripts was published by Slimvolume in 2016, and her novel Collapsing In Parts was published by Mousse in 2012.

Jesper List Thomsen (Denmark/United Kingdom/Greece) is an artist and writer. Recent exhibitions and performances include Hollis and Money, ICA, London and Künstlerhaus, Stuttgart; Speak Through You, Hot Wheels Projects, Athens; A Social Body Event, Serpentine Gallery, London; Micro-Composition, Rozenstraat, Amsterdam; The body, the body, the tongue, Reading International; Hand and Mind, Grand Union, Birmingham; The boys the girls and the political, Lisson Gallery, London; and One Hour Exhibition, South London Gallery, London. A book-length collection of his texts will be published in Autumn 2018 by Juan de la Cosa (John of the Thing). He is also a part of the artist collective Am Nuden Da.

Magdalena Magiera (Germany/Singapore) is Curator, Outreach & Education at NTU CCA Singapore. She was an independent curator, Managing Editor of frieze d/e, and currently Editor of mono.kultur, a quarterly interview magazine. She co-curated Based in Berlin (2011) as well as exhibitions for The Building and SPLACE in Berlin. Magiera was Project Manager of The Maybe Education and Other Programs at dOCUMENTA(13), Kassel (2012) and UNITEDNATIONSPLAZA, Berlin (2006–08). Prior to joining NTU CCA Singapore, she worked for e-flux exhibitions and public programmes in New York City.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Cally Spooner, OFFSHORE in Kingston, 2018. Courtesy the artist. 

Culture City. Culture Scape.
Guided Tour at Mapletree Business City II
7 Sep 2018, Fri 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
5 Oct 2018, Fri 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
3 Nov 2018, Sat 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM
8 Dec 2018, Sat 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM

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Meeting point: Alexandra Retail Centre
(460 Alexandra Road, Main Entrance, Taxi Stand)

Explore the new art installations nestled in the lush compound of Mapletree Business City II (MBC II). Themed Culture City. Culture Scape., this public art project, commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore comprises works by internationally renowned artists Dan Graham (United States), Zulkifle Mahmod (Singapore), Tomás Saraceno (Argentina/Germany), and Yinka Shonibare (Nigeria/United Kingdom).

Inspired by the idea of expanded sculptural environments, the artworks explore the interplay between landscape, architecture, and the broader social and economic environments they are placed in. More than being monumental or site-specific, each work alters or permeates its local context to invite visitors to a broader, richer engagement.

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Culture City. Culture Scape. is part of the Mapletree-NTU CCA Singapore Public Art Education Programme, which includes regular guided tours, public events, educational materials, seminars, and conferences. 

To register or for further queries, please email ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg.

 

Image credit: Tomás Saraceno, Stillness in Motion – 3 Airborne Self-Assemblies, 2017, steel frame, reflective panels, steel wire, Mapletree Business City II, installation view.

OFFSHORE IN SINGAPORE: Radical Philosophy School for Embodied Knowledge
6 Oct 2018, Sat 01:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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OFFSHORE IN SINGAPORE
Radical Philosophy School for Embodied Knowledge
With Maggie Segale, Cally Spooner, and Jesper List Thomsen

OFFSHORE – 
A structure that enables EVERYONE
(some of whom will have met before, some
of whom will not have met) to maintain a
state of rehearsal, over a number of days,
in public.

OFFSHORE IN SINGAPORE is a day-long school, which asks what durations, pragmatics, and cooperative arrangements might upset contemporary, patriarchal states of chrono-normativity and chrono-normative accounts of history. Chrono-normativity, in its simplest terms, may be understood as all life being engineered to run on the same clock: a clock usually set by those in power, to grant control, maximum efficiency, and profit. It is a temporal regime which renders slower and more durational activities such as maintenance and care—crucial to our survival— invisible. Through studying forms of “hidden,” often disavowed time, the school day will open up thoughts around maintenance in correlation to a “continual rehearsal” and the concept of “ongoingness;” forms of practical work that are never “done” and are therefore profoundly reciprocal, as they mould and are moulded by its subjects.

Maggie Segale will be exploring the ways in which a body “keeps count” as an alternative to neo-liberal metrics; the counting, measuring, assessing, and financialising of day-to-day life. Through simple, pedestrian movements Segale will work with the group to realise a stored memory or experience in their bodies (say, frustration in a shoulder, or tension in a hand) and then move with it, to find where time and memory embeds and shapes a present through the body. Jesper List Thomsen will lead a session on how to accumulate language within over time, by sharing several durational pieces of writing he has made, as readings and as a discussion. Cally Spooner will give a lecture on deep time geology and cognitive capitalism.

OFFSHORE is an itinerant performance company and school formed by Cally Spooner to draft new vocabulary and terms of how to organise, work, and perform. “Arriving from literature, theatre, and a messy, unrequited love affair with philosophy, OFFSHORE sits somewhere between a philosophy school for embodied knowledge, an engine, an alibi, a backroom, a rehearsal, and some deliberate, unguaranteed, social plumbing.”

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Special Performance by Cally Spooner
6.30 – 7.00pm
 
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BIOGRAPHIES 

Maggie Segale (United States) is a dancer, artist, and teacher with a focus on performing and interdisciplinary, collaborative work. She graduated from the Juilliard School, where she received multiple awards and fellowships including the 2014 Entrepreneurship Fellowship for her writing on self-image and dance. Segale works with Helen Simoneau Danse, Bryan Arias, and artist Cally Spooner, having collaborated with A24 Films, Center for Innovation in the Arts, Roya Carreras in the upcoming Pussy Riot music video, composer Zubin Hensler, and Matilda Sakamoto. Segale choreographed the opera Role of Reason at the Interarts Festival 2018, and was an Artist-in-Residence at the New Jersey Dance Theatre Ensemble (2016).

Cally Spooner’s (United Kingdom/Greece) absurdist scripts, fictions, and installations render visible the choreography of invisible violence in the digital age, reflecting on the erosion of life in neoliberal and technological milieus. Her comedic and dystopian replays of the political, economic, and media rhetoric of our time act as virulent critiques of corporate performance and “chrono-normative history” alike. Considering these as “corrosive” to both life and utterance, she responds by presenting rehearsals and duration as a mode of resistance. Always “in the making,” each exhibition or work by Spooner is a continuation and rehearsal of the last. Evolved over long periods of time, across a variety of venues, constellations of immaterial and mediated matter arrive through writing, objects, drawing, casts of performers, and sound. Recent solo exhibitions include Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève (2018); Whitechapel Gallery, London (2017); New Museum, New York (2016); and Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2016). Recent group shows include Serpentine Gallery, London (2017) and the Geneva Moving Image Biennial (2016–17). Upcoming shows include Castello di Rivoli, Turin (2018); Swiss Institute, New York (2018); and Art Institute Chicago (2019). Spooner’s book of Scripts was published by Slimvolume in 2016, and her novel Collapsing in Parts was published by Mousse in 2012.

Jesper List Thomsen (Denmark/United Kingdom/ Greece) is an artist and writer. Recent exhibitions and performances include Hollis and Money, ICA, London and Künstlerhaus, Stuttgart; Speak Through You, Hot Wheels Projects, Athens; A Social Body Event, Serpentine Gallery, London; Micro-Composition, Rozenstraat, Amsterdam; The body, the body, the tongue, Reading International; Hand and Mind, Grand Union, Birmingham; The boys the girls and the political, Lisson Gallery, London; and One Hour Exhibition, South London Gallery. A book-length collection of his texts will be published in autumn 2018 by Juan de la Cosa (John of the Thing). He is also a part of the artist collective Am Nuden Da.

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Part of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II

Image credit: OFFSHORE IN KINGSTON. Courtesy Cally Spooner.

Workshop: Performance Art by Kai Lam
7 Oct 2018, Sun 10:00 AM - 06:00 PM

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This one-day performance art workshop advocates performance as a form of creative initiative and art activism that empowers individuals and collectives. Focusing on spontaneous body-related art practices, the workshop will also touch upon radical art practices and actions, secular rituals, and creation of live art images.

To register your participation, please email: indiearchive@singnet.com.sg 

The workshop includes an introduction on performance art in two parts:

  1. A brief survey of performance art practices and history of performance art in Singapore (1990s to 2000s), with a focus on: The Artists Village’s past identity; individual performance artists’ works; and historical and social issues relating to performance art practices in general.
  2. A brief introduction of site specificity in the ephemeral art process, looking in particular at spaces and spatiality, and its aesthetic values and socio-cultural significance.

And two exercises:

Exercise 1

Participants will bring one or more objects of aspiration and share the stories behind these objects: what the objects mean to them and why they selected it. Participants are also encouraged to bring visual art materials and music/soundscapes (e.g. paint and paper, readings, different genres of music/soundscapes) that they may like to use in the workshop. A 10-minute exercise will be conducted with each of the participants’ selected objects and materials.

Objective 1

Explore the subject of identity and personal aspirations; bridge individual ideas with the significance of object materiality in performance; contextualise ideas with the body, materials and symbolic gestures; and transform ideas into performance presentation.

Exercise 2

Participants will choose a site or location within the Independent Archive and its surrounding environment that is socially or culturally significant to their own personal living conditions. All participants are required to present a 10-minute site-specific performance, whether a collaboration with each other or a solo performance. A post-mortem discussion will be conducted after.

Objective 2

Observe site specificity; investigate into space as a performative process of shared meaning-making; derive social and personal significance out of object materials, sounds (music) and physical spaces.

To register your participation, please email: indiearchive@singnet.com.sg 

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BIOGRAPHY

Kai Lam (Singapore) practices multidisciplinary art that is geared towards performative tendencies. Believing that an art practice should span across diverse mediums, he is versatile and prolific in skills of drawing, painting, sculpture, mixed-media installation, sonic art and performance art.

His involvement in the arts began in 1995 when he majored in Sculpture at Lasalle-SIA College of the Arts. In 2001, he was awarded a study grant from Lee Foundation and an education bursary from National Arts Council to undertake his Bachelor of Arts at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology where he majored in Sculpture. He has participated and collaborated in many multidisciplinary art productions and co-organised art-related events, including Artists Investigating Monuments (AIM) in 2000, under The Artists Village, which took place in various public sites in Singapore. Starting from 2003, he also co-organised a few editions of Future Of Imagination, an annual international performance art festival. In 2009, he initiated Rooted In The Ephemeral Speak (R.I.T.E.S), a platform to explore new ideas and cross-disciplinary presentations in sonic art, time-based and performance art-related practices.

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A public programme of Journey of a Yellow Man. Selected Materials from the Independent Archive

Image credit: Kai Lam, Fish walk, 2007, 72-13 TheatreWorks, Singapore. Courtesy the artist.

Reading by Peter Sipeli
13 Oct 2018, Sat 05:00 PM - 06:00 PM

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*Kindly note that 1angrynative also planned on doing a reading for this programme, but due to unforeseen circumstances, will not be able to join. 

 

Maps to the Ancestors
by Peter Sipeli

Maps to the Ancestors is a poem by Peter Sipeli that leverages digital tools using sound, imagery, and spoken word. It is part of a solo performance exploring ways of connection with the ancestors premised on the belief that to be without language is to be caught in a state of being without maps, without the vehicle to allow one’s access to the knowledge of the ancestors. The idea that our DNA holds secret to our heritage implies that memory is inherited. We come to know that inside of us are all the memories of our ancestors and the return to the source becomes a spiritual process of an inwards journey into the self to unlock these secret connections. With this performative reading of Maps of the Ancestors, Sipeli hopes to map a journey into his past and across his different heritage and bloodlines (Fijian, Tongan, Samoan, Pacific Islander, Scottish, etc.) As a second generation, Pacific urbanite, and though he does not have language other than English, Sipeli believes he would be able to find lost parts of himself through his poetry and spoken word performances.

Peter Daniel Sipeli (Fiji) is passionate about storytelling because he believes that stories humanise people by showing that we all face the same choices, struggles, and triumphs. A well-known spoken word artist, he was instrumental in the revitalisation of the Fiji SLAM in Suva. He founded the Poetryshop Fiji to fill a development gap for new and emerging local writers, as well as the only online Pacific islands arts magazine ARTalk. Having worked for 10 years with NGOs as a human rights and LGBTQ activist, he has also worked in the Fiji Arts Council and in the Dean’s Office at the Fiji School of Medicine. Additionally, he managed the popularised ROC Sunday street market.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Peter Sipeli 

Launch: Afterall Journal Issue 46 and Exhibitions Histories Book
13 Oct 2018, Sat 02:00 PM - 05:00 PM

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NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore is hosting the launch of the Afterall journal issue 46, Autumn/Winter 2018 as well as the latest publication in the Afterall Exhibition Histories series, Artist-to-Artist: Independent Art Festivals in Chiang Mai 1992–98 with the presence of the editors on Saturday, 13 October 2018.

As part of the three-year research and publishing partnership between the Nanyang Technological University and the University of the Arts London started in 2017, issue 46 was conceived in Singapore in a collective effort by the editorial team (Ute Meta Bauer, Ana Bilbao, Charles Esche, Anders Kreuger, David Morris, Anca Rujoiu, and Charles Stankievech). This issue traverses different geographies and contexts, from Southeast Asia to the Americas with a focus on artistic practices that take a clear position against the long-lasting endurance of oppressive systems, be it racial, patriarchal or colonial. The performative body of work of Singaporean artist Lee Wen and his explorations on identity and representation are unpacked in two essays by Alice Ming Wai Jim, Professor and Concordia University Research Chair in Ethnocultural Art Histories, Canada, and Võ H`ông Chu’o’ng-Đài, Researcher at Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong. Yin Ker, Assistant Professor at the School of Art, Design and Media at Nanyang Technical University, Singapore, discusses the internal complexities of the Burmese contemporary art scene in one of this issue’s contextual essays.

The discussion on issue 46 will be preceded by a presentation of Afterall’s history by its Co-founder, Charles Esche, Director of Van Abbemuseum, The Netherlands. Celebrating 20 years of activity this year, Afterall journal is widely acknowledged for its in-depth analysis of artistic practices, contextual essays, engagement with exhibition histories and curatorial practices within various geographical constituencies.

Edited by David Teh and David Morris, Artist-to-Artist: Independent Art Festivals in Chiang Mai 1992–98 is published by Afterall Books in association with Asia Art Archive and the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, United States. The publication is the first comprehensive survey on a series of festivals known as Chiang Mai Social Installation, emerging amidst a regional constellation of artists’ initiatives and independent spaces.  The book presents extensive photographic documentation alongside a multivocal account by its participants and commissioned writers.

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SCHEDULE

2.00pm
Introduction by Ute Meta Bauer

2.15 – 3.00pm
20 Years of Afterall, presentation by Charles Esche

3.00 – 4.00pm
Launch of the Afterall issue 46 introduced by editors: Ute Meta Bauer, Ana Bilbao, Charles Esche, Anders Kreuger, David Morris, Anca Rujoiu, and Charles Stankievech

4.15 – 5.00pm
Launch of the publication Artist-to-Artist: Independent Art Festivals in Chiang Mai 1992–98, Afterall Exhibition Histories, introduced by the book’s editors: David Teh and David Morris

5.00 – 5.30pm
Performative Reading by Peter Daniel Sipeli
*Kindly note that 1angrynative also planned on doing a reading, but due to unforeseen circumstances, will not be able to join. 

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BIOGRAPHIES

Ute Meta Bauer (Germany/Singapore) is the Founding Director of the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore; Professor at the School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University where she teaches in the MA in Museum Studies and Curatorial Practices; and an editor of Afterall journal. Previously, she was Professor and Dean of the School of Fine Art at the Royal College of Art, London and Associate Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States, where she served as the Founding Director of ACT, the Program in Art, Culture, and Technology.

Ana Bilbao (Mexico/United Kingdom) is an editor of Afterall journal and a Research Fellow in Afterall Research Centre in Central Saint Martins (CSM), University of the Arts London. She often teaches at the University of Essex courses in modern and contemporary art history, curating, and the history of exhibition-making. Recently she was a Visiting Scholar in the Art History department at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Charles Esche (Netherlands) is Director of Van Abbemuseum, The Netherlands, Professor of Contemporary Art and Curating at CSM, University of the Arts London, and Co-director of Afterall journal and books. He teaches on the Exhibition Studies MRes course at CSM, and at Jan van Eyck Academie, Maastricht, The Netherlands. He received the 2012 Princess Margriet Award from the Eureopean Cultural Foundation and the 2014 Center for Curatorial Studies Bard College Prize for Curatorial Excellence.

Anders Kreuger (Sweden/Belgium) is Curator at M MKA Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp, and an editor of Afterall journal. He was previously Director of the Malmö Art Academy and Exhibitions Curator at Lunds konsthall, Sweden, and a member of the Programme Team for the European Kunsthalle, Cologne. A frequent contributor to Afterall journal, Kreuger has also published numerous catalogue essays and other texts.

David Morris (United Kingdom) is an editor of Afterall journal and the Exhibition Histories series. He is Associate Lecturer on the Exhibition Studies MRes course at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. He has also been working with the Semiotext(e) archive since 2011, with a focus on the 1975 Schizo-Culture conference.

Anca Rujoiu (Romania/Singapore) is a curator and editor of the Afterall journal. Curator for exhibitions and later Manager of Publications, she was part of the founding team at the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore contributing to numerous exhibitions, as well as the public and publishing programme of the institution.

Charles Stankievech (Canada) is founding faculty member of the Yukon School of Visual Arts in Dawson City, Canada; Assistant Professor in the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto; and an editor of Afterall journal. Since 2011, he has been Co-director of the art and theory press K. Verlag in Berlin.

David Teh (Australia/Singapore) is Associate Professor at the National University of Singapore. His writings have appeared in journals including Third Text, ARTMargins, Afterall, and Theory, Culture and Society. His book Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary was published by MIT Press in 2017. Teh is part of the curatorial team of the 2018 edition of Gwangju Biennale, South Korea.

Behind the Scenes: artist Tyler Coburn and Zhuo Hongyi, Project Manager, Toh Garden
14 Oct 2018, Sun 02:00 PM - 05:00 PM

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Please register via Peatix: https://tylercoburntohgarden.peatix.com/

During his 2017 residency at NTU CCA Singapore, Tyler Coburn developed a relationship with Singapore’s Toh Garden, which cultivates many orchid hybrids named after politicians and celebrities. In turn, Coburn legally named one of the Garden’s hybrids “Richard Roe,” a name used in American and British case law when the actual name of a person cannot be given. This session will start at NTU CCA Singapore, where Coburn will introduce his orchid hybrid and elaborate on the conventions of naming, then conclude at Toh Garden with a tour led by Zhuo Hongyi.

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BIOGRAPHIES

Tyler Coburn (United States) works with writing, installation, performance, and sound, addressing historical and emergent forms of labour: from the artist to the data miner, the factory worker to the cognitariat. Coburn works in a research-oriented, interdisciplinary, and occasionally collaborative manner, involving the participation of those working within the fields in question. No matter the focus of a given project, there are certain questions that drive Coburn’s practice at large: What does creative (or “uncreative”) writing look like in the 21st century? How can an artwork engage the complexities of our legal, technological, and geopolitical networks? Finally, what becomes of “subjectivity” and “the self” within post-human discourse? Coburn received a BA in Comparative Literature from Yale University and an MFA from the University of Southern California. He also served as a fellow in the Whitney Independent Study Program from 2014–15. His work has been presented at South London Gallery; Kunstverein Munich; Kunsthalle Wien; Western Front, Vancouver; Grazer Kunstverein; UCCA, Beijing; and Sculpture Center, New York. Coburn participated in the 11th Gwangju Biennale and the 10th Shanghai Biennale. His writing has appeared in e-flux journal, Frieze, Dis, Mousse, and Rhizome. Coburn was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from June to July 2017.

Zhuo Hongyi (Singapore) is Project Manager at Toh Garden. Raised in a family of commercial orchid growers, Zhuo has a BSc in Life Sciences from National University Singapore. At Toh Garden, he is mainly responsible for the orchid projects, securing orchid supplies and designing orchidscapes for clients. Zhuo has managed projects with the National Orchid Garden, Gardens by the Bay, Orchid Country Club, and UBS AG, among others.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Tyler Coburn, Richard Roe, 2018, orchid hybrid legally named “Richard Roe” by the artist, custom glass pots fabricated by Verreum, performance and related texts. Commissioned by Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary. Courtesy the artist. 

Conversation: Narrating and Digitalising Asian Art Histories with Chu’o’ng-Đài Võ
14 Oct 2018, Sun 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

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This talk will discuss the importance of archival collections for the writing of art histories in Asia. Chương-Đài Võ will begin with an overview of Asia Art Archive’s (AAA) online collections, in particular, those related to Southeast Asia. The second half of the talk will focus on the Lee Wen Archive, an ongoing project that AAA started in 2017 in collaboration with NTU Centre for Contemporary Art Singapore. 

The Lee Wen Archive covers the span of his practice as an artist, organiser, and writer, starting in the early 1980s: his solo and collaborative projects, his notebooks and sketchbooks, his formative period with The Artists Village, his writings and correspondences, and his extensive documentation of art collectives and festivals in Asia and Europe. Among this latter batch of material are photographs and video documentation of artists who participated in ground-breaking festivals such as Artists’ General Assembly, Nippon International Performance Art Festival, and Asiatopia. 

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BIOGRAPHY

Chương-Đài Võ (Hong Kong) is a Researcher at Asia Art Archive. Based in Hong Kong, she specialises in modern and contemporary art related to Southeast Asia. Her writing can be found in publications such as Afterall Journal, Revues culturelles (forthcoming from Institut national d’histoire de l’art), Taipei Fine Arts Museum’s Modern Quarterly, the anthology Film in Contemporary Southeast Asia, and Journal of Vietnamese Studies. She is a former Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

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A public programme of Journey of a Yellow Man. Selected Materials from the Independent Archive

Image credit: Lee Wen Archive on Asia Art Archive website.

Reading: Richard Roe by artist Tyler Coburn
16 Oct 2018, Tue 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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Tyler Coburn will read from his forthcoming book, a fictional memoir of the legal person “Richard Roe” that accompanies his orchid hybrid of the same name. This text, a hybrid of an essay and stand-up comedy, describes a world populated by legal fictions that creep around the margins of selfhood—and increasingly dictate the terms of economic and political process. Coburn will read the first chapter of this book, which discusses everything from the ancient trials of objects to recent arguments for the legal personhood of rivers and other elements of the natural world.

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BIOGRAPHY

Tyler Coburn (United States) works with writing, installation, performance, and sound, addressing historical and emergent forms of labour: from the artist to the data miner, the factory worker to the cognitariat. Coburn works in a research-oriented, interdisciplinary, and occasionally collaborative manner, involving the participation of those working within the fields in question. No matter the focus of a given project, there are certain questions that drive Coburn’s practice at large: What does creative (or “uncreative”) writing look like in the 21st century? How can an artwork engage the complexities of our legal, technological, and geopolitical networks? Finally, what becomes of “subjectivity” and “the self” within post-human discourse? Coburn received a BA in Comparative Literature from Yale University and an MFA from the University of Southern California. He also served as a fellow in the Whitney Independent Study Program from 2014–15. His work has been presented at South London Gallery; Kunstverein Munich; Kunsthalle Wien; Western Front, Vancouver; Grazer Kunstverein; UCCA, Beijing; and Sculpture Center, New York. Coburn participated in the 11th Gwangju Biennale and the 10th Shanghai Biennale. His writing has appeared in e-flux journal, Frieze, Dis, Mousse, and Rhizome. Coburn was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from June to July 2017.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Tyler Coburn, Richard Roe (detail: drawing by Krisia Ayala), 2018, orchid hybrid legally named “Richard Roe” by the artist, custom glass pots fabricated by Verreum, performance and related texts. Commissioned by Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary. Courtesy the artist. 

Residencies Insights: Curatorial Consciousness. Participation between Practice and Process, lecture by Dr Michael Birchall (United Kingdom), Curator-in-Residence
17 Oct 2018, Wed 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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As artists have moved towards models of post-studio practice in which the art object is no longer privileged above other forms, the gallery itself becomes a site for production, dialogue, and debate. In this lecture, Dr Michael Birchall argues that the museum has transformed itself into a site of participation through the facilitation of socially engaged art projects. Whether socially engaged art commissions manifest inside the museum as installations or sites of activity or outside as collaborations with specific communities, curators build special relationships with each stakeholder—the museum, the artist, and the community—and they have become increasingly aware of the role of their audiences as participants.

This talk is presented as part the Mapletree-NTU CCA Singapore Art Education Programme series.

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BIOGRAPHY

Dr Michael Birchall (United Kingdom) is Curator of Public Practice at Tate Liverpool and Senior Lecturer in Exhibition Studies at Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom. His curatorial practice and research concern socially engaged art, performance, and notions of publicness in museums. He has previously held curatorial appointments at The Banff Centre’ Walter Phillips Gallery and The Western Front (both Canada), as well as at the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart (Germany). His writing has appeared in Frieze, ARKEN Bulletin, OnCurating, Modern Painters, C Magazine, Art & the Public Sphere, and various exhibition catalogues. Recently, he co-edited Collective Good/Collaborative Efforts (Stavanger: Rogaland Kunstsenter, 2017) and co-curated O.K. – The Musical (2017), an iterative community theatre musical by Christopher Kline at Tate Liverpool. 

Image caption: Alex Turgeon, The Tilting at Windmills, 2017. Courtesy Tate Liverpool.

 

 

 

Workshop: Daily Practice – Through a Performative Lens by artist and educator Kelly Reedy and choreographer Susan Sentler
20 Oct 2018, Sat 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM
3 Nov 2018, Sat 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM

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Registration is required via Peatix:

20 October — https://dailypractice.peatix.com/
3 November — https://dailypractice3nov.peatix.com/

Rooted in the varied modes of performance by artists within the exhibition Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II, this workshop explores activities and strategies to stretch our daily embodied and sensory awareness. It will facilitate participants in discovering and physicalising the building blocks utilised as material for the various performative modalities experienced. Moreover, through play and tuning in to somatic (bodily) knowledge, the over-riding exhibition theme of climate change can be proactively dialogued and questioned.

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BIOGRAPHIES

Kelly Reedy (United States/Singapore) has worked in Singapore for over 18 years as an artist and educator, holding an MA in Education, Hunter College, and an MA in Art Therapy, LASALLE College of the Arts. She has exhibited her artworks internationally in Paris, Chicago, and Berlin, as well as locally at Jendela Visual Arts Space, Esplanade, Singapore Tyler Print Institute, and Alliance Française. Reedy has developed educational resources for the National Gallery Singapore and trained teachers at the National Institute of Education, specialising in visual arts education in museums and galleries. Reedy is a long-term collaborator for NTU CCA Singapore’s workshop for teachers.

Susan Sentler (United States/United Kingdom/Singapore) is a choreographer, teacher, researcher, director, dramaturg, and performer. She was senior lecturer at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance for 18 years and has taught globally in the field of dance for over 30 years. Sentler performed with the Martha Graham Ensemble, and has recently returned to performing in works by artists such as Tino Sehgal, Xavier le Roy, and Jérôme Bel. Her multi-disciplinary practice is anchored by a honed somatic relationship to image, working in gallery and museum contexts to create “responses” or “activations” for specific visual artworks as well as generating personal durational installations. She is a lecturer at the School of Dance & Theatre at LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Irina Baldini in stroke/sky/stroke. Courtesy Susan Sentler.

Avalanche XIV by Carlos Casas with special guests composer Phill Niblock and musician Brian O’Reilly
20 Oct 2018, Sat 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Avalanche is an audio-visual environment and installation that documents the life in Hichigh, one of the highest inhabited villages in the Pamirs, a region in Central Asia known as the “roof of the world.” Working from the starting point of the local cosmogony, traditions, and its music, Avalanche is a multiformat work and expanded ethnographic research based on the human ecology and richness of the region. One of the most remote regions of the planet, the Pamirs are as mysterious as fascinating, home of some of the most rich and archaic traditions, considered the nest and origin of most of the monotheistic beliefs, and the perfect site for understanding our spiritual journey as humans. Avalanche is also a study on cinematic time and the human ecology of isolated communities. A meditation about the unstoppable “avalanche” of civilisation, about the elusiveness of time and the dusk of a village and endurance and resilience of its inhabitants and traditions.

Avalanche is a long-term commitment and Singapore’s iteration is developed site-specifically for the Centre and presented as a live-editing and live-soundtrack environment, featuring special collaborations with Phill Niblock and musicians from Singapore.

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BIOGRAPHIES 

Carlos Casas (Spain/France) works with film and the sonic. His last three films have been awarded in festivals around the world including Torino, Madrid, Buenos Aires, and Mexico City. He has recently concluded a trilogy of films, END, dedicated to the most extreme environments on the planet: Patagonia, Aral Sea, and Siberia. Avalanche is a lifelong project and site-specific film based on one of the highest inhabited villages in the Pamirs, a mountain range in Central Asia. His films have been shown in festivals such as the Venice Film Festival; Rotterdam Film Festival; FID Marseille; BAFICI Buenos Aires; Jeonju International Film Festival, South Korea; Documenta Madrid; FICCO Mexico; and others. His works have been presented at institutions including Tate Modern, London; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Hangar Bicocca, Milan; Bozar Bruxelles; Oi Futuro, Rio de Janeiro; MIS São Paulo; Centre Pompidou and Fondation Cartier, Paris; Centre Cultura Contemporanea, Barcelona; MALBA, Buenos Aires; and GAM, Torino. He was Creative Director of Colors Music and Films from 2005–08 where he developed audio-visual projects and music research in various regions around the world. He is Co-founder of Map Productions and the visual sound label Von Archives. Casas is Visiting Professor at Dartmouth College, United States, and ECAM, the Madrid film school. He was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from December 2017 to February 2018.

Phill Niblock (United States) is an intermedia artist using music, film, photography, video, and computers. Since the mid-60s he has been making music and intermedia performances shown at numerous venues around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut; the Kitchen, New York; Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; ZKM, Karlsruhe; Harvard University’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Cambridge; World Music Institute, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris and Metz; and the Maerzmusik Festival, Berlin. Since 1985, he is the Director of the Experimental Intermedia Foundation (EI) in New York, which he joined as member in 1968. He is the Producer of Music and Intermedia presentations at EI since 1973 (about 1,000 performances) and the curator of EI’s XI Records label. In 1993, he was part of the formation of an EI organisation in Gent, which supports artists-in-residence. Niblock’s music is available on the XI, Moikai, Mode, VonArchive, Touch, and Extreme labels. In 2014, he was the recipient of the John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in New York. Recently, he presented films and photographs from 1970 and ’71 at Tate Modern, London, with music from the past three years.

Brian O’Reilly (United States/Singapore) works within the fields of electro-acoustic composition, sound installations, moving images and noise music. He is also a contrabassist focusing on uncovering the inaudible textures and hidden acoustic microsounds of his instrument through the integration of electronic treatments and extended playing techniques. In addition to his solo performances and works for moving images, he also plays modular analog synthesizer and generates visuals in the duo Black Zenith and contrabass & electronics with the noise-jazz group Game of Patience. Currently, he is a lecturer at LASALLE’s College of the Arts School of Contemporary Music, focusing on electronic music composition, visual music and creative music making techniques through the use of improvisation.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image credit: Carlos Casas, Avalanche, 2009–ongoing. Courtesy the artist. 

Screenings: Movement of People Working (1973–85)
and T H I R (1992) by Phill Niblock
21 Oct 2018, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Live diffusion by Phill Niblock
6.00 – 7.00pm

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Movement of People Working

Movement of People Working is a series of films by Phill Niblock that portray human labour in its most elementary form—construction work, harvesting, planting and fishing, physical exertion, with the help of basic tools. The films are scenes of people in nonindustrialised communities, doing continually repeated movements of manual labour, while their faces are often kept outside the frame. They pre-announce the contradictions and paradoxes of globalisation. Made between 1973–1991, it was filmed in locations including Peru, Mexico, Brazil, Hungary, Portugal, China, and Japan.

 

T H I R

T H I R (1992) is taken from Ten Hundred Inch Radii, the fourth and final instalment in his Environments series that started in 1968. From 1968 to 1972, Phill Niblock presented four distinct intermedia projects, titled Environments I, II, III, and IV, (some in multiple versions) within various venues in New York City. T H I R was from a performance event that incorporated over two hours of original 16mm nature footage from the Adirondack Mountains of northern New York State. This is a seminal work that incorporates a combination of multi-screen film projection, dance, 35mm colour slides, and original music (generally from tape or occasionally performed live). With T H I R, Niblock repeatedly experimented with the relationships, interactions, and hierarchies of seemingly discrete art forms in order to encourage intermedial encounters that were flexible, unstable, and structurally open.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Phill Niblock (United States) is an intermedia artist using music, film, photography, video, and computers. Since the mid-1960s he has been making music and intermedia performances shown at numerous venues around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut; the Kitchen, New York; Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; ZKM, Karlsruhe; Harvard University’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Cambridge; World Music Institute, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris and Metz; and the Maerzmusik Festival, Berlin. Since 1985, he is the Director of the Experimental Intermedia Foundation (EI) in New York, which he joined as member in 1968. He is the Producer of Music and Intermedia presentations at EI since 1973 (about 1,000 performances) and the curator of EI’s XI Records label. In 1993, he was part of the formation of an EI organisation in Gent, which supports artists-in-residence. Niblock’s music is available on the XI, Moikai, Mode, VonArchive, Touch, and Extreme labels. In 2014, he was the recipient of the John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in New York. Recently, he presented films and photographs from 1970 and 1971 at Tate Modern, London, with music from the past three years.

 

Image taken from: https://doppelleben.mumok.at/media/images/pn_thumbs.max-1000×800.jpg.

Behind the Scenes: artist Carlos Casas and composer Phill Niblock
23 Oct 2018, Tue 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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Artist Carlos Casas together with eminent composer and filmmaker Phill Niblock will discuss their approaches to film, video, and soundscapes. Sharing their experience of collaborating on Avalanche—the project on view in Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II—Casas and Niblock will expand on notions of improvisation and site-specificity. 

The work Avalanche documents Hichigh, a village in Tajikistan and one of the highest located villages in the world. With each iteration and presentation, the work will change according to the context and space it’s being presented.

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BIOGRAPHIES 

Carlos Casas (Spain/France) works with film and the sonic. His last three films have been awarded in festivals around the world including Torino, Madrid, Buenos Aires, and Mexico City. He has recently concluded a trilogy of films, END, dedicated to the most extreme environments on the planet: Patagonia, Aral Sea, and Siberia. Avalanche is a lifelong project and site-specific film based on one of the highest inhabited villages in the Pamirs, a mountain range in Central Asia. His films have been shown in festivals such as the Venice Film Festival; Rotterdam Film Festival; FID Marseille; BAFICI Buenos Aires; Jeonju International Film Festival, South Korea; Documenta Madrid; FICCO Mexico; and others. His works have been presented at institutions including Tate Modern, London; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Hangar Bicocca, Milan; Bozar Bruxelles; Oi Futuro, Rio de Janeiro; MIS São Paulo; Centre Pompidou and Fondation Cartier, Paris; Centre Cultura Contemporanea, Barcelona; MALBA, Buenos Aires; and GAM, Torino. He was Creative Director of Colors Music and Films from 2005–08 where he developed audio-visual projects and music research in various regions around the world. He is Co-founder of Map Productions and the visual sound label Von Archives. Casas is Visiting Professor at Dartmouth College, United States, and ECAM, the Madrid film school. He was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from December 2017 to February 2018.

Phill Niblock (United States) is an intermedia artist using music, film, photography, video, and computers. Since the mid-60s he has been making music and intermedia performances shown at numerous venues around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut; the Kitchen, New York; Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; ZKM, Karlsruhe; Harvard University’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Cambridge; World Music Institute, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris and Metz; and the Maerzmusik Festival, Berlin. Since 1985, he is the Director of the Experimental Intermedia Foundation (EI) in New York, which he joined as member in 1968. He is the Producer of Music and Intermedia presentations at EI since 1973 (about 1,000 performances) and the curator of EI’s XI Records label. In 1993, he was part of the formation of an EI organisation in Gent, which supports artists-in-residence. Niblock’s music is available on the XI, Moikai, Mode, VonArchive, Touch, and Extreme labels. In 2014, he was the recipient of the John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in New York. Recently, he presented films and photographs from 1970 and ’71 at Tate Modern, London, with music from the past three years.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Carlos Casas, Avalanche, 2009–ongoing, film, sound performance. Courtesy the artist.

Late Night at NTU CCA Singapore
27 Oct 2018, Sat 10:00 PM - 12:00 AM

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NTU CCA SINGAPORE 5th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
 
 
10.00 – 11.00pm
Improvisation by artist Ming Wong (Singapore/Germany)
The Single Screen, Block 43 Malan Road
 
Taking the theme of the celebration, Free Jazz, literally, Ming Wong will create an improvised performance during the five-year anniversary party of NTU CCA Singapore. Highly influenced by cinema, Wong’s work unravels ideas of “authenticity,” “originality,” and the “other,” with reference to the act of human performativity. He explores how culture, gender, and identity are constructed, reproduced, and circulated, forming politics of representation.
 
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11.00pm – 12.00am
Avalanche XIV (2009–ongoing) by artist Carlos Casas (Spain/France) and guests George Chua and Cheryl Ong (both Singapore)
The Exhibition Hall, Block 43 Malan Road
 
For this special occasion, Carlos Casas invited musicians George Chua and Cheryl Ong to respond to his site-specific installation through a live-editing and sound situation.
 
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BIOGRAPHIES
 
Ming Wong (Singapore/Germany) builds layers of cinematic language, social structure, identity, and introspection through his re-telling of world cinema and popular culture in his videos, installations, and performances. With imperfect translations and re-enactments, he casts himself as every character in a story. Wong attempts to unravel ideas of “authenticity,” “originality,” and the “other,” with reference to the act of human performativity. He explores how culture, gender, and identity are constructed, reproduced, and circulated, forming politics of representation. Though untrained as an actor, his work is highly influenced by cinema and in constant dialogue with measures of performativity, gender, and difference. Recent projects have become more interdisciplinary, incorporating performance and installation to flesh out his exploration of cultural artefacts from around the world. Wong represented Singapore at the 53rd Venice Biennale in 2009 with the solo presentation Life of Imitation, which was awarded a special mention. He has had solo exhibitions at leading institutions worldwide, including UCCA, Beijing; Shiseido Gallery, Tokyo; and REDCAT, Los Angeles. He has been included in numerous international biennials, including Performa, New York; Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane; Sydney Biennale; Shanghai Biennale; Lyon Biennale; Liverpool Biennial; and Busan Biennale.
 
Carlos Casas (Spain/France) works with film and the sonic. His last three films have been awarded in festivals around the world including Torino, Madrid, Buenos Aires, and Mexico City. He has recently concluded a trilogy of films, END, dedicated to the most extreme environments on the planet: Patagonia, Aral Sea, and Siberia. Avalanche is a lifelong project and site-specific film based on one of the highest inhabited villages in the Pamirs, a mountain range in Central Asia. His films have been shown in festivals such as the Venice Film Festival; Rotterdam Film Festival; FID Marseille; BAFICI Buenos Aires; Jeonju International Film Festival, South Korea; Documenta Madrid; FICCO Mexico; and others. His works have been presented at institutions including Tate Modern, London; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Hangar Bicocca, Milan; Bozar Bruxelles; Oi Futuro, Rio de Janeiro; MIS São Paulo; Centre Pompidou and Fondation Cartier, Paris; Centre Cultura Contemporanea, Barcelona; MALBA, Buenos Aires; and GAM, Torino. He was Creative Director of Colors Music and Films from 2005–08 where he developed audio-visual projects and music research in various regions around the world. He is Co-founder of Map Productions and the visual sound label Von Archives. Casas is Visiting Professor at Dartmouth College, United States, and ECAM, the Madrid film school. He was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from December 2017 to February 2018.
 
George Chua (Singapore) has been active since the late 1990s. He currently uses the modular synth as a live performance tool to create electronic music with oblique shifts in sound and rhythm. As an investigator and explorer, he has no interest in developing a singular style. The physicality of the sound takes precedence in his performances.
 
Cheryl Ong (Singapore) is a percussionist active in music performance and education, regularly performing with avant-rock group The Observatory and SA, a trio that uses traditional Chinese instruments with modern sensibilities. A recipient of the National Arts Council Arts Bursary (Overseas), Ong graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing, with a degree in Chinese Percussion. Though classically trained, Ong consistently struggles with the division of classical and traditional music and the limits of their roles.
 
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Part of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II
Conversation: NTU CCA Singapore International Advisory Board Members
27 Oct 2018, Sat 01:00 PM - 05:00 PM

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NTU CCA SINGAPORE 5th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

with Doryun Chong, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, M+, Hong Kong; Professor Nikos Papastergiadis, Director, Research Unit in Public Cultures and Professor, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne; Philip Tinari, Director Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing; and Professor Ashley Thompson, Hiram W. Woodward Chair, Southeast Asian Art and Chair, South East Asian Studies, SOAS University of London; chaired by Professor Ute Meta Bauer, Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore and Professor, School of Art, Design and Media, NTU

NTU CCA Singapore takes its five-year anniversary as an opportunity to invite the newly-appointed and continuing International Advisory Board (IAB) members to a public discussion on art institutions, missions and visions, and potentialities for change. Having their own institutions as case studies and being placed within a global perspective, the panelists will share thoughts on the role of a national research centre such as NTU CCA Singapore within the local arts ecosphere. How does it function as a practical and social construction for a community? What are the current concerns it should address?

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BIOGRAPHIES


Doryun Chong
 (South Korea/Hong Kong)is Deputy Director & Chief Curator at M+, a new museum of visual culture, which will open its Herzog and de Meuron-designed building in 2020 in the West Kowloon Cultural District in Hong Kong. Appointed as the inaugural Chief Curator in 2013, Chong oversees all curatorial activities and programs including acquisitions, exhibitions, learning and public programs, and digital initiatives encompassing the museum’s three main disciplinary areas of design and architecture, moving image, and visual art.  Some of the exhibitions he has curated at M+ include Mobile M+: Live Art, Tsang Kin-Wah: The Infinite Nothing, Hong Kong in Venice (both 2015), and Noguchi for Danh Vo: Counterpoint (forthcoming 2018). Prior to joining M+, Chong worked in various curatorial capacities at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis (2003­–2009) and MoMA, New York (2009–2013).

Nikos Papastergiadis (Australia) is the Director of the Research Unit in Public Cultures, based at The University of Melbourne. He is a Professor in the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne and Founder – with Scott McQuire – of the Spatial Aesthetics research cluster. He is Project Leader of the Australian Research Council Linkage Project, “Large Screens and the Transnational Public Sphere,” and Chief Investigator on the ARC Discovery Project “Public Screens and the Transformation of Public Space.” His long involvement with the groundbreaking international journal Third Text, as both co-editor and author, was a formative experience in the development of an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research model, which continues to inform his research practice. His publications include Spatial Aesthetics: Art Place and the Everyday (2006), and Cosmopolitanism and Culture (2012). He is also the author of numerous essays, which have been translated into over a dozen languages and appeared in major catalogues such as the Biennales of Sydney, Liverpool, Istanbul, Gwangju, Taipei, Lyon, Thessaloniki, and Documenta 13. 

Ashley Thompson (United Kingdom) is Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS University of London, where she leads the Research and Publications division of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme. She is a specialist of Cambodian cultural history, with a focus on classical and pre-modern arts and literatures. Objects of analysis include sculpture, ritual practices and texts, as well as other forms of fine and performing arts. The Cambodian case is informed by research on the larger South and Southeast Asian context with a view to theorising politico-cultural formations. Formative experiences include working under Hélène Cixous for her PhD, under Vann Molyvann for the creation of a Cambodian national management structure for Angkor, and with the Théâtre du Soleil and Phare Ponleu Selpak on the direction of a Cambodian production of Cixous’ Terrible but Unfinished Story of Norodom Sihanouk, King of Cambodia. Recent publications include Engendering Cambodia: Territory, Sovereignty and Sexual Difference in the Inventions of Angkor (2016); “Hiding the female sex: a sustained cultural dialogue between India and Southeast Asia” (2017); “Emergenc(i)es: History and the Auto-Ethnographic Impulse in Contemporary Cambodian Art” (2017).

Philip Tinari (United States/China) has served as Director of UCCA, China’s leading independent institution of contemporary art, since late 2011, assuming the title of Director in 2017. During his tenure, he has led its transition from a founder-driven private museum into an accredited museum and foundation. He has mounted more than 70 exhibitions, introducing key international figures and tracking China’s evolving art scene through retrospectives and surveys of leading established and emerging Chinese artists. In 2009, he launched LEAP, an internationally distributed, bilingual art magazine published by the Modern Media Group. From 2006 to 2009 he wrote for and helped to launch an online Chinese edition of Artforum, where he remains a contributing editor. Tinari was Co-curator, with Alexandra Munroe and Hou Hanru, of the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, which opened at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 2017 and traveled to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Tinari is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum and a Fellow of the Public Intellectuals Program of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Fluent in Mandarin and resident in Beijing since 2001, Tinari holds degrees from Duke and Harvard, and is currently completing a doctorate in art history at Oxford.

Ute Meta Bauer (Germany/Singapore) is Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore and Professor, NTU ADM. Previously, she was Associate Professor in the Department of Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, where she also served as Founding Director of the MIT Program in Art, Culture, and Technology. For more than three decades, Bauer has worked as curator of exhibitions and presentations, connecting contemporary art, film, video, and sound through transdisciplinary formats. She publishes regularly on artistic and curatorial practice. Bauer served as expedition leader of TBA21–Academy The Current 2015–18 exploring the Pacific Archipelago and littorals that are most impacted by climate change and human interventions in their environments.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image credit: (L–R) Doryun Chong, Professor Nikos Papastergiadis, Professor Ashley Thompson, and Philip Tinari

Cause to Know: with artists Koh Nguang How and Gilles Massot
28 Oct 2018, Sun 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM

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Cause to Know is a recalling, retelling, and remembering of mostly-forgotten pockets of Singapore’s performance art history and artists. The treasure trove of photographic and video documentation created and collated by Koh Nguang How and Gilles Massot will be the initial departure point into the people, performances, exhibitions, events, and happenings that we only hear about in casual conversations over coffee and cigarettes, but are difficult to find in writing. An informal symposium of sorts that will invite many others to speak and share, Cause to Know highlights the need to rely on the oral history that circulates among artists who were participants and witnesses.

 

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BIOGRAPHIES

Koh Nguang How (Singapore) artistic practice started in 1988 and encompasses photography, collage, assemblage, installation, performance art, documentation, archiving, curating and research. He worked in the National Museum Art Gallery as a Museum Assistant from October 1985 to December 1991. He was a researcher in the pilot Fukuoka Asian Art Museum Researcher/Curator in Residence Program 1999. He photo-documented the activities of The Artists Village since its first open studio show in 1989, to the Post-Ulu show in 1999. His collection of materials on art and culture also enabled him to initiate his Singapore Art Archive Project in 2005. His newspaper cuttings collection under the title Artists in the News were part of the 3rd Singapore Biennale (2011). He was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from July 2015 to January 2015. 

Gilles Massot (France/Singapore) is a multidisciplinary artist and academic whose work is based on the idea of “the space between things” and aims to establish links and decipher the narratives existing between disciplines, people, occurrences, and parts of the world. His visual art practice more specifically deals with the theory of photography and its relation to time and space. After studying architecture and photography in Marseille, he came to live in Singapore in 1981. His early participation to the local art scene saw him involved in a string of seminal art events, including the first editions of the Festival of Arts Fringe and the 1987 Yin Yang Festival.  He currently lives in Singapore where he teaches in LASALLE – College of the Arts. His work is part of the LTA Integrated Art Program (Buona Vista Station), the Singapore Art Museum and the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris among other collections. He is a recipient of the French cultural award Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres.

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A public programme of Journey of a Yellow Man. Selected Materials from the Independent Archive

Image caption: Lee Wen, Future of Imagination 2, 2004, Sculpture Square, Singapore. Photo by Gilles Massot / Cassandra Schultz. Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore / Independent Archive.

Behind the Scenes: artist Alexandra Pirici and dancer Farid Fairuz
30 Oct 2018, Tue 07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

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Artist and choreographer Alexandra Pirici will speak about the basis for Re-Collection (2018), the performative exercise developed for Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II. This exercise explores how performing bodies can reflect memories of nature, culture, and life on earth. Pirici and dancer Farid Fairuz will share about the fluid and dynamic process of exchange that occurs between the dancers while they influence each other and decide on configurations, arrangements, and sequences.
 
Moderated by Magdalena Magiera, Curator, Outreach & Education, NTU CCA Singapore

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BIOGRAPHIES

Farid Fairuz (Romania) reinvented himself, assuming a fictional biography. Previously working as the artist Mihai Mihalcea, he was one of the most active in the field of contemporary dance in Romania, after 1989. He has been part of many of the projects that led to the international recognition of Romanian contemporary dance and he played a key role in the establishment of structures and institutions that have become landmarks of this area. Between 2005 and 2013, he was Director
of the National Dance Center in Bucharest.

Alexandra Pirici (Romania) is a classically-trained dancer and choreographer who naturally transitioned into the art world as her works grew increasingly experimental. Her performative installations straddle contemporary dance, performance, body art, and sculpture, while acknowledging the dramatic shifts in contemporary understanding of labour and the body, revealing the influence of present geopolitical realities. With choreographed pieces that work undisciplined, spanning across mediums and spatial contexts, Pirici addresses ideas of history, collective body, the rise of technology’s agency over the “human,” and the invisible structures and hidden mechanisms of power. The artist’s use of the human living body as a medium is a reflection on and exploration of such ideas and their impact on the “human” subject. Pirici has exhibited widely, including at the decennial art exhibition Skulptur Projekte Münster 2017; the Romanian Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale; Tate Modern, London; New Museum, New York; the 9th Berlin Biennale; Manifesta 10; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Museum Ludwig Cologne; Neuer Berliner Kunstverein, Berlin; the 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition; the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin; and the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; among others. In 2015 she received the Excellency Award from the National Dance Centre, Bucharest. 

Magdalena Magiera (Germany/Singapore) is Curator, Outreach & Education at NTU CCA Singapore. She was an independent curator, Managing Editor of frieze d/e, and currently Editor of mono.kultur, a quarterly interview magazine. She co-curated Based in Berlin (2011) as well as exhibitions for The Building and SPLACE in Berlin. Magiera was Project Manager of The Maybe Education and Other Programs at dOCUMENTA(13), Kassel (2012) and UNITEDNATIONSPLAZA, Berlin (2006–08). Prior to joining NTU CCA Singapore, she worked for e-flux exhibitions and public programmes in New York City.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Alexandra Pirici, Delicate Instruments of Engagement, 2017. Russian Museum St. Petersburg, within Access Point. Photo by Vadim Frolov. Courtesy the artist.

Journey of a Yellow Man. Selected Materials from the Independent Archive
15 Sep 2018, Sat - 25 Nov 2018, Sun

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On the occasion of the launch of the Digital Resource Platform, NTU CCA Singapore is presenting a selection of materials from Singapore’s Independent Archive (IA), a research and resource platform dedicated to time-based media, established by internationally-renowned artist Lee Wen (Singapore) in 2012. For the past six years, the IA captured the zeitgeist of performance art in Singapore and larger (South-)East Asia through artistic collaborations.

This presentation in The Lab is organised into five chapters —“Condition,” “Body,” “Formation / Gestalt,” “Absence,” and “Memory”—that look at the development of performance art as a new medium as well as its political conditions. Journey of a Yellow Man. takes visitors through the archive with photographs, videos, writings, sketchbooks, while simultaneously, introducing the digital archive. As of today, the Centre has digitalised 20,000 files from the IA.

The practice of Lee Wen is motivated by social investigations that use art to interrogate stereotypical perceptions of culture and society. He became famous for his performance series Journey of a Yellow Man (1992—), where he embodied his Chinese descent and its relationship to oppressive systems.

The presentation provides insight into a continuously expanding resource platform that highlights ephemeral moments in the history of performance art in Singapore. The project addresses the importance of providing historically significant source material for researchers and the wider public. The digitalised files will be integrated into NTU CCA Singapore’s Public Resource Platform and will be accessible at the Centre, the Independent Archive, and the Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, a collaborative partner of this project.

With IA, a series of public programmes will take place in both The Lab at the NTU CCA Singapore and in the IA. The programme highlights IA as a “living archive” that not only serves as a reference library and archive focusing on time-based and event-specific art, but is also a gathering space that offers dynamic programmes in a vibrant network of artists, musicians, and the public. 

Journey of a Yellow Man is curated by Sophie Goltz, Deputy Director, Research and Academic Programmes, NTU CCA Singapore, in collaboration with Lee Wen, artist and Founder, Independent Archive, Singapore, Bruce Quek, Research, Independent Archive, and Kamiliah Bahdar, Public Programmes, Independent Archive. Project Assistant: Ho See Wah, Young Professional Trainee, NTU CCA Singapore. Assistant to Lee Wen: Liu Wen Chao, Library, Independent Archive.

The NTU CCA Digital Resource Platform was initiated in 2016 by Ute Meta Bauer, Founding Director, NTU CCA Singapore, and Professor, NTU ADM Singapore and Lee Wen, in collaboration with Chương-Đài Võ, Researcher, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong. Assistant to the project: Bruce Quek with the support of Samantha Leong Min Yu, Executive, Conferences, Workshops & Archive, NTU CCA Singapore (till May 2018), Corine Chan Li Ling, Executive Archive, NTU CCA Singapore (May to July 2018), and Pooja Paras Mehta (2017), Ho See Wah (2018), Young Professional Trainees, NTU CCA Singapore.

Please see below the collaborative public programme with the Independent Archive. 

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BIOGRAPHY

Lee Wen (Singapore) was awarded the Cultural Medallion of Singapore in 2009. He entered the art scene comparatively late in the ‘80s, but quickly gained attention. His early practice was associated with The Artists Village in Singapore and later forged a more individuated artistic career. Lee Wen has been exploring different strategies of time-based and performance art since 1989. He helped initiate both R.I.T.E.S. (Rooted In The Ephemeral Speak) (2009-) and Future of Imagination (2003-), an international performance art event. Since 2012, he has taken an active interest in the memory of Singapore’s performance art history through the initiation of the Independent Archive. Recent group exhibitions include SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now, The National Arts Centre and Mori Art Museum, Japan (2017), Secret Archipelago, Palais de Tokyo, France (2015) and a solo show at the Singapore Art Museum (2012). Lee Wen was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from August 2014 to February 2015.

 

Image credit: Lee Wen, Journey of a Yellow Man No. 15: Touching China, 2001, Pengshan County, Leshan, China. Courtesy Independent Archive.

In The Vitrine:

Luca Lum
impasse to verbal
21 Sep 2018, Fri - 9 Dec 2018, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Interested in the “semiotic thickness” of Geylang, an area located on the east-central side of Singapore where bustling street life, covert activities, information technologies, and data mining protocols are increasingly intertwined, Luca Lum has been observing the diffuse entanglements of bodies and surfaces, behaviours and networks that define contemporary urban life. impasse to verbal comes out from her continued engagement with the neighbourhood and from her speculations on the slippage between what things are, how they look, and what they do—which the artist defines as the play between description and disposition.

The work is a visual assemblage that merges wall notices, official zoning maps, personal routes, and various extracts sampled from the urban landscape. Through an intricate interplay of stratifications and transparencies, it creates an imploded visual environment where information is simultaneously displayed and withdrawn, revealed and cloaked. Steeped in a pervasive blue glow reminiscent of the light of electronic devices, the signs are left to float and clash into leaky configurations that shatter conventional patterns of readability.

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BIOGRAPHY

Luca Lum (b. 1991, Singapore) works at the intersection of art, performance, poetry, and fiction exploring ideas of language, (anti)literature, vulnerability, vampirism, genre, intimacy, double-agency, mourning and metaphor. She is a co-founder of the artist-run space soft/WALL/studs and co-editor of the reader CONCRETE ISLAND. Her projects have been presented at Cemeti Institute of Art and Society, Yogyakarta, Indonesia (with soft/WALL/studs, 2018); Yeo Workshop, Ikkan Art Gallery, NUS Museum, Singapore (2016), and LUMA Westbau, Zurich, Switzerland (2015). Lum was Artist-in-Residence at NTU CCA Singapore from April to September 2018.

Image credit: Luca Lum, impasse to verbal (detail), 2018. Courtesy the artist. 

Memorise a Short Story by Heman Chong
21 Sep 2018, Fri - 6 Nov 2018, Tue 01:00 PM - 06:00 PM

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**COME MEMORISE A SHORT STORY**

Be a part of Heman Chong’s durational performance as part of the exhibition Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II

Heman Chong’s A Short Story About Geometry is a transaction between an instructor and a participant, with the main “protagonist” being a short story written by the artist in 2009. It is the first of seven stories, each approximately 500 words long and specifically written to be transmitted via memorising the story, word for word. The story is taught only verbally by the instructor, who holds the text in her hands.

Participants are requested to not leave the room until the transaction is completed, and they have memorised the story by heart. Chong has promised that this story will never be published neither on paper nor digitally; the content remains known only to the instructor and the participants. As they offer their time and energy to receive the gift of the story, a unique way of ‘reading’ it emerges each time this situation occurs.

Transactions will take place Saturdays and Sundays over the course of the exhibition period, 21 September – 6 November 2018, starting each day from 1.00pm.

To book a slot with your personal coach, please email your preferred day and time to: ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg

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BIOGRAPHY

Heman Chong’s (Singapore) practice is located at the intersection between image, performance, situations, and writing. He has held solo exhibitions at Art Sonje Center, Seoul; South London Gallery; Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai; 72-13, Singapore; Calle Wright, Manila; Rossi & Rossi, Hong Kong; and the Swiss Institute, New York. He is currently working on a novel The Book of Drafts to be published by Polyparenthesis in 2019. He was an NTU CCA Singapore Artist-in-Residence from September 2016 to February 2017. 

 

Image caption: Heman Chong, A Short Story About Geometry, 2009. Photo by Ho Rui An. Courtesy the artist.

Screening Programme: Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II
21 Sep 2018, Fri - 6 Nov 2018, Tue 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Videos will be shown on a continuous loop during opening hours over the course of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II. 

 
21 – 30 September 2018
Mariana Silva, Digital Specimens: Pointcloudfallout, 2015, 10 min 35 sec

In Digital Specimens: Pointcloudfallout an offscreen dialogue, set in the near future, unfolds on the politics of scanning artefacts and monuments into 3-D. Amidst the consequences of climate change and war, the two characters discuss how digital copies unsettle repatriation claims and colonial tensions under the pretext of digital conservation.

Mariana Silva (Portugal/United States) has exhibited and screened her work at Anthology Film Archives, New York (2018); Gwangju Biennale (2016); Moscow Biennale (2016); and EDP Foundation, Lisbon (2015); among others. Solo shows include For more Information, fluent, Santander (2018); Camera Traps, Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon (2018); Audience Response Systems, Parkour, Lisbon (2014); P/p, Mews Project Space, London (2013); Environments, e-flux exhibition space, New York (2013); and The Organization of Forms, Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon (2011). She was a resident at Gasworks (2016), Zentrum Paul Klee Sommerakademie, Bern (2010), and at ISCP, New York (2009–10). Together with artist Pedro Neves Marques, she runs Inhabitants, an online channel for exploratory video and documentary reporting (inhabitants-tv.org).


2 – 7 October 2018
Justin Shoulder and Bhenji Ra, Deep Alamat, 2014, 4 min

Deep Alamat is a compelling narrative concerning two mythic figures, “OO” and “Beige Cantrell,” drawn from the artists’ collective imaginations. Shoulder’s OO is from his series of Fantastic Creatures that feature sculptural costumes and are animated in live performance, video, and photographic works. OO’s patterns are a form of Aposematism (warning colouration). OO performs a gestural dance drawing from animal signals and carnivalesque spectacle. Initially inspired by a one-hit-wonder pop star, Beige Cantrell derives from Ra’s obsession with digital failure, internet hype, software intelligence, and the online secondary experience. Ra’s understanding of movement, body control, and precision allows for his character to physically represent ideas of recognition software as he scans, detects, and aligns his body accordingly.

Club Ate is a Sydney-based collective founded by artists Justin Shoulder and Bhenji Ra (both Philippines/Australia), who draw from their own experiences and personal relationships as queer, bi-cultural Filipino-Australians in their art making. Justin Shoulder works in performance, sculpture, and video. His main body of work, Fantastic Creatures, comprises invented beings and alter-personas based on interpretations of mythology, folktale, and fantasy. These creatures are embodied through movement and elaborate, hand-crafted costumes and prostheses, forging connections between queer, migrant, spiritual, and intercultural experiences. Bhenji Ra is an interdisciplinary artist who reframes performance through a combination of dance, choreography, video, and installation. Her work is often concerned with the dissection of cultural theory and identity. She uses spectacle and her own personal histories to explore themes of race, sexuality, and gender, giving voice to hidden and marginalised communities, and suggesting alternative modules of community.

9 – 14 October 2018
Anton Ginzburg, Ultraviolet,  2015, 25 min

Ultraviolet explores the issues of perception and phenomenology at the intersection of nature and technology. The film is divided into three parts that correspond to the musical structure and composition. The film was conceived as an ongoing dialogue with its soundtrack composed by Michael Pisaro. The relationship between the cinematic image and the live sound is an experiment in a tradition of expanded cinema. It starts with very high frequencies in the first part, later working its way down into the guitar range. The film addresses the aura of representation through the video footage of various landscapes such as waterfalls, trees, and mountains, both in high- and low-res.

Anton Ginzburg (Russia/United States) is known for his films, sculptures, paintings, and text-based printed work that investigates historical narratives and poetic studies of place, representation, and post-Soviet identity. He earned a BFA from The New School for Social Research and an MFA from Bard College, Milton Avery Graduate School of Arts. His work has been shown at the 54th Venice Biennale; the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston; Southern Alberta Art Gallery, Canada; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; White Columns, New York; Lille 3000, Euralille, France; and the first and second Moscow Biennales. His films have been screened at the Whitechapel Gallery, London; Rotterdam International Film Festival; Dallas Symphony Orchestra; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; Les Rencontres Internationales, Paris; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin; and New York Film Festival/Projections; among others.

16 – 21 October 2018
Vladimir Erofeev, Pamir: Krysha mira (Pamir: Roof of the World), 1927, 49 min (original: 71 min)
Version with music by Carlos Casas

Vladimir Erofeev (1898–1940) was a pioneer of expedition cinema in the Soviet Union, advocating for increased attention and investment in edifying non-fiction films made to win the interest of broad audiences. In summer 1927, a trek to the mountainous Pamir region, known as the “Roof of the World,” in present-day Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, was organised by the Sovkino studio in co-operation with the Geological Committee. Erofeev worked with prominent geologist Dmitrii Nalivkin and ethnographer Mikhail Andreyev, who had both extensively researched the area and contributed to the planning for the crew’s journey. The film starts off in Moscow, the symbolic centre of the new empire, leading through Samara and Orenburg, to Tashkent and Osh, and further on to the Pamir Mountains of Central Asia. The film features the expedition’s progress through crossing mountain rivers, traversing snowy passes and descending into valleys in bloom, while at the same time recording the daily practices of the Krygz nomads, the religious customs of a Tajik village community, finally entering Dushanbe, observing the city life in the capital of Soviet Tajikistan. The final result demonstrates a portrait of a rich and vibrant region in which the interaction of various cultures have not yet fully streamlined to the requirements of the uniformed all-Soviet world.


23 – 28 October 2018
Phill Niblock, The Magic Sun, 1966, 60 min

Shot in 1966, while the Sun Ra Arkestra was still based in New York City (before relocating to Philadelphia in 1968), the composer and filmmaker Phill Niblock’s The Magic Sun is an obscure artefact of profound beauty. It features frenetic black-and-white footage of the band playing, and an incredible soundtrack. Its existence displays an often understated relationship between two contemporary iterations of the New York avant-garde. Considering the neglect that free jazz usually suffers in the face of its peer, the film could be considered important for that alone, being also a wonderful journey through sight and sound.

Phill Niblock (United States) is an intermedia artist using music, film, photography, video, and computers. Since the mid-60s he has been making music and intermedia performances shown at numerous venues around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Wadsworth Atheneum, Connecticut; the Kitchen, New York; Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels; Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Akademie der Künste, Berlin; ZKM, Karlsruhe; Harvard University’s Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Cambridge; World Music Institute, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris and Metz; and the Maerzmusik Festival, Berlin. Since 1985, he is the Director of the Experimental Intermedia Foundation (EI) in New York, which he joined as member in 1968. He is the Producer of Music and Intermedia presentations at EI since 1973 (about 1,000 performances) and the curator of EI’s XI Records label. In 1993, he was part of the formation of an EI organisation in Gent, which supports artists-in-residence. Niblock’s music is available on the XI, Moikai, Mode, VonArchive, Touch, and Extreme labels. In 2014, he was the recipient of the John Cage Award from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in New York. Recently, he presented films and photographs from 1970 and ’71 at Tate Modern, London, with music from the past three years.


30 October – 6 November 2018
Luke Fowler, Country Grammar (with Sue Tompkins), 2017, 18 min 29 sec

The film begins with Tompkins performing at Chem19 Recording Studio. The camera films from a multitude of perspectives, employing rhythmic pans, tilts, and opaque or reflective screens. These distorted views, combined with non-synchronised images of the performer, depart from a 70s “direct cinema” approach to filming musicians. After the ritualistic opening section, the film widens its view to locations outside of the studio. The repetition of actions (picking books from a shelf, re-arranging the contents of a fridge) suggest a searching for a threshold between the filmed image and Tompkins’ own spoken word acts. Taking cues from the performers’ hypnotic yet concrete play with words, the film creates a metaphoric, symbiotic language, where an open-ended approach to montage transcends both reductive imagery and straight documentation.

Luke Fowler (United Kingdom) is an artist, filmmaker and musician based in Glasgow. His work explores the limits and conventions of biographical and documentary filmmaking, and has often been compared to the British Free Cinema of the 1950s. Working with archival footage, photography and sound, Fowler’s filmic montages create portraits of intriguing, counter cultural figures, including Scottish psychiatrist R. D. Laing and English composer Cornelius Cardew.

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A public programme of Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II.

Image caption: Phill Niblock, still from The Magic Sun, 60 min, 1966. Courtesy the artist.