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Screening Series: Faces of Histories
14 May 2019, Tue - 18 Jul 2019, Thu

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SCHEDULE

All works will be screened in a loop during opening hours, Tuesday – Sunday, 12.00 – 7.00pm.

14 May – 19 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, From the Dark Depths, 2017

21 May – 26 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, Red Saga, 2004

28 May – 9 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Vietnam the Movie, 2015

11 June – 23 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Fifth Cinema, 2018

25 June – 7 July 2019 (except 28 – 30 June): Munem Wasif, Kheyal, 2015–18

9 July – 17 July 2019: Munem Wasif, Machine Matter, 2017

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This screening series features artist films and video works that examine the socio-political and environmental effects colonisation and industrialisation have had on how we frame and perceive places and histories. Artists explore the realities of constructing a new identity amidst changing borders, overwritten cultures, and blurred lines of fact or fiction. The screening series includes works by artists Kiri Dalena (Philippines), Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam), and Munem Wasif (Bangladesh). Each work will be shown for a period of one to two weeks on loop during opening hours.

 

FILM SYNOPSES

14 May – 19 May 2019 

From the Dark Depths, Kiri Dalena, 2017, 27 min

Based on the true story of the drowning of a young activist, Dalena’s film From The Dark Depths opens with a beautiful and surreal sequence underwater in which a woman dances slowly brandishing a red flag. Around her, many red flags are planted in the seabed. This hypnotic and captivating dream is shuttered by sequences with authentic 16mm, analogue, and digital video footage from the artist’s own archive. This includes documentation of political unrest spanning two decades and an ominous long-track of a police car at night prompting the citizens to respect the curfew—a gloomy reminder of a lost freedom.

Kiri Dalena will be in conversation with artist and filmmaker Lucy Raven and curator Philippe Pirotte on 14 May 2019, 7.00 – 8.30pm, as part of the public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again. Details of the programme here.

 

21 May – 26 May 2019

Red Saga, Kiri Dalena, 2004, 15 min

Red Saga (2004), recounts the intense armed hostility towards radical individuals and serves as a call for sustained uprising. Amidst scenes of children faithfully guarding the last harvest from thieves, a red flag is waved with movements building in vigor and determination with each act of silenced injustice. This poetic film offers a glimpse into the passion and pain of the people’s protracted war in the Philippine countryside.

 

28 May – 9 June 2019

Vietnam the Movie, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2015, 45min

Vietnam the Movie uses a carefully structured montage of clips from drama and documentary films to give a chronological account of Vietnamese history from the mid-1950s to the late 1970s, encompassing the end of French colonialism and the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War. The excerpts chosen contrast a variety of external and often oppositional views, ranging from mainstream Hollywood drama to European art-house. Source material from the United States includes Apocalypse NowBorn on the Fourth of July, and Forrest Gump, whilst Europe is represented by the works of Harun Farocki, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, and Jean-Luc Godard. Nguyen also inserts extracts from the films of Nagisa Oshima, Satyajit Ray, and Ann Hui. This technique suggests that any “true” picture of Vietnam has been lost to the multiplicity of symbolic purposes to which the country, its people, and their tribulations have been put. Nguyen’s re-situated selection and collection of archival material offers the viewer an alternative memory and recollection of history.

 

11 June – 23 June 2019

Fifth Cinema, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2018, 56 min

Foregoing voice in favour of the written wordand juxtaposing moving images of the filmmaker’s own daughter with archival images of Vietnamese women seen through the lens of the “ship’s officers”, Fifth Cinemaslowly leads the viewer through a narrative of colonialism, indigeneity, and cinematic limitations in representation. The film’s text – by Maori filmmaker Barry Barclay, who coined the term “Fourth Cinema” to distinguish Indigenous cinema from the established “First, Second, and Third Cinema” framework– provides structure to Nguyen’s hybrid essay film that moves on multiple cinematic and topical terrains.Fifth Cinema premiered at The 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art in 2018. 

 

25 June – 7 July 2019

Kheyal, Munem Wasif, 2015–18, 23 min 34 sec

Kheyal follows four characters through the streets of Old Dhaka in Bangladesh. The title is derived from the Arabic word “Khyal” or “Khayal,” meaning fiction or imagination. The film captures the enigmatic environments and unique identities inhabiting the historic city. Wasif describes his film as a work of magic realism, where the lone characters are “lost in certain mental states and found in other magical situations.” The film shifts between real and imagined narratives, navigating between the conscious and subconscious, and reveals the very different rhythm of life that inhabits the old city. Kheyal was produced with the support of Bengal Foundation and first shown at The 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art in 2018.

 

7 – 17 July 2019

Machine Matter, Munem Wasif, 2017, 14 min 5 sec

Wasif examines the death of the jute industry in Bangladesh and the destruction of the livelihoods the “golden fibre” once supported. Until the mid-20th century, the jute industry was strong in the Indian subcontinent as jute twine was employed to package the world’s cotton, grains, coffee, sugar, and cement. However, with the shift of power from East Bengal to Pakistan after the partition in 1947, the jute industry began to generate most of the income for the new state, diverting profits away from small stakeholders in East Bengal and leaving factories without work. Using still frames, the artist captures an abandoned jute mill and the former workers who ran the machines—the union of man and machine that formed the heart of a major industry. 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Kiri Dalena (Philippines) is an acclaimed visual artist and filmmaker known for her works which reveal persistent social injustices and inequalities, particularly in the Philippines. She graduated from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños with an undergraduate degree in Human Ecology, and pursued further studies in 16mm documentary filmmaking at the Mowefund Film Institute. She has been featured in several international art events such as the Singapore Biennale (2013), Yokohama Triennale (2014), and the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015). Her works are currently in the permanent collections of the Singapore Art Museum, Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Ateneo Art Gallery.

 

Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam) is a Hanoi-based filmmaker and moving image artist. Her diverse practice – traversing boundaries between film and video art, installation and performance – consistently engages with memory and history, and reflects on the roles and positions of art and artists in society and the environment. Nguyen studied journalism, photography, international relations, and ethnographic film in the United States. Her films and video art works have been shown at festivals and art exhibitions including Asia Pacific Triennale of Contempory Art (APT9) in Brisbane2018; Sydney Biennale2018; Jeu de Paume, Paris; CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux; the Lyon Biennale 2015; Asian Art Biennial 2015, Taiwan; Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial 2014; Singapore Biennale 2013; Jakarta Biennale 2013; Oberhausen International Film Festivaland the Rotterdam International Film Festival. Nguyen is founder and director of Hanoi DOCLAB, an independent centre for documentary film and the moving image art in Hanoi since 2009. She previously showed at NTU CCA Singapore in the exhibition Ghosts and Spectres – Shadows of History (2017).

 

Munem Wasif (Bangladesh) explores complex socio-political issues through photography and video. His artistic practice is marked by close engagement and intimate commitment, both physical and psychological, to his subjects of interest and it usually unfolds through long-term research processes. While interested in the archival and social value of documentary photography, his works often confound the boundaries between fact and fiction. He has participated in international exhibitions such as Sharjah Biennial 14 (2019); the 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2018-19); An Atlas of Mirrors, Singapore Biennale (2016), among numerous others. Wasif is currently Artist-in-Residence at NTU CCA Singapore (2 April – 1 July 2019).

 

This screening series runs in parallel to NTU CCA Singapore’s current exhibition Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again, responding to themes of the Singapore Bicentennial.

 

Image caption: Kiri Dalena, Gikan sa Ngitngit nga Kinailadman (From the Dark Depths), 2017, Single-channel video, sound, 27 min. Courtesy the artist.

Talk: How does art shape our cities? by Vere van Gool (The Netherlands/United States), Associate Director, IdeasCity, New Museum, New York
11 Jul 2019, Thu 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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As Associate Director of IdeasCity since 2015, Vere van Gool will present the project’s trajectory and key initiatives, while examining how artists are responding to conditions of urbanism across the globe. Located at the intersection of activism, design, and technology, IdeasCity is the New Museum’s collaborative, civic, and creative platform for artistic practices engaging with the public realm. The initiative provides a forum for practitioners to exchange ideas, identify challenges, propose solutions, and engage the public’s participation, having had editions in Arles, Athens, Detroit, Istanbul, New Orleans, New York, São Paulo, and Toronto.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Vere van Gool (Netherlands/United States) is a curator and writer, currently working as Associate Director of IdeasCity at the New Museum in New York. Previous positions include curator for Het Nieuwe Instituut and researcher for Forensic Architecture. Van Gool’s writing has been featured in BOMB Magazine, e-flux, Pin-UpReal Review, and Vogue. She has presented work at the Gwangju Biennale, Harvard University, Independent Curators International, LUMA Arles, NEON Athens, Matadero Madrid, and SOMA Mexico. Van Gool graduated from the Architectural Association with honours in 2014.

 

Image caption: Courtesy Justin Milhouse.

Film Programme: Resonating Structures
18 Jul 2019, Thu - 17 Nov 2019, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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In the early 1970s, Siah Armajani’s experimentation with computer-based graphics paved the way not only for a new aesthetic field, but also expanded his artistic practice to new territories. Taking his film work on the exploration of structures and lines using computer graphics as a point of departure, this film series expands into a presentation of films by other filmmakers/ artists in a similar theme of “line structure” and three others of Armajani’s tropes of interests: bridges, houses, and gardens. (Links at bottom for more information.) Just as Armajani’s Dictionary for Building (1974–75) deconstructs the typology of domestic architecture, these films explore new meanings of functional, social, and visual concepts of architecture and space.

 

Event, 1970
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 6 min 41 sec.
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

 

To Perceive 10,000 Different Squares in 6 Minutes and 55 Seconds, 1970 
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 7 min 37 sec.
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

 

Before/After, 1970
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 1 min 50 sec.
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

 

Inside/Outside, 1970
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 1 min 40 sec.
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

 

Rotating Line, 1970
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 1 min 26 sec.
Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

 

Line, 1970
Computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 1 min 16 sec.
Courtesy of the artist and Rossi & Rossi, Hong Kong.

 

Since the 1960s, Siah Armajani has explored the use of technology as a medium as well as in the intersection of art with science. In 1970, he produced a series of experimental films using a computer capable of printing on 16mm celluloid at the Hybrid Computer Laboratory, University of Minnesota. In these films he generated moving lines and shapes using mathematical formulae and computer programming to create the illusion of three-dimensional space and time on one-dimensional surfaces that ultimately point to the functionalism of space, a consistent thread in Armajani’s work.

 

Event is an explicit example of such a connection as it brings together the notions of architecture’s social space through texts, equations, and diagrams. To Perceive 10,000 Different Squares in 6 Minutes and 55 Seconds presents ten thousand squares, each in a single frame in descending order of size; with the illusion of a single square hovering in space.Before/After suggests spatial and temporal ambiguity, depicted by two synchronised animated representations of movements over time. Inside/Outside explores the function of boundaries and the concept of closed and open systems in a space. Rotating Line illustrates the blurring of dimensional states within a space through the transition of a single point into a line that subsequently appears to rotate in and out of the screen. In Line, Armajani reflects upon the inadequacy of painting and sculpture in expressing ideas through the most basic aesthetic form.

 

These six films will be played on loop during opening hours from 18 July to 17 November, 2019. During this time, a presentation of films by other filmmakers/ artists, grouped according to the themes Line Structure, Bridges, Houses, and Gardens, will also be shown in conjunction with Siah Armajani’s films. For more information on film schedule, please visit the links below.

 

Image caption: Siah Armajani, Event, 1970, computer-generated 16mm film transferred to digital file, b&w, silent, 6 min 41 sec. Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2015.

Talk: Siah Armajani: Follow This Line
20 Jul 2019, Sat 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

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By Victoria Sung, Assistant Curator of Visual Arts, Walker Art Center.

Following the major retrospective of Siah Armajani’s six-decade-long career held at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Met Breuer, New York, co-curator Victoria Sung will expand on Armajani’s practice and public art commissions. Sung will focus on the artist’s Reading Rooms, particularly the one included in the exhibition, Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3, and think through the role of museums as public and educational spaces.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Victoria Sung (United States) is Assistant Curator of Visual Arts at Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, where she co-curated Siah Armajani: Follow This Line (2018), the artist’s first major retrospective in the United States, and co-edited the accompanying catalogue. The exhibition travelled to the Met Breuer, New York. Recent projects include Theaster Gates: Assembly Line(2019); Laure Prouvost: They Are Waiting for You(2017); and Katharina Fritsch: Multiples(2017). She holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard College, a master’s degree in history of art and visual culture from the University of Oxford, and a master’s degree in business administration from Harvard Business School.

 

Image Caption: Siah Armajani, Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3, 1988. Installation view of the exhibition Siah Armajani: Follow This Line, Walker Art Center, September 9 – December 30, 2018. Courtesy Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Photo by Bobby Rogers.

Open Call for Siah Armajani: Spaces for the Public. Spaces for Democracy.
20 Jul 2019, Sat - 3 Nov 2019, Sun

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As part of Siah Armajani: Spaces for the Public. Spaces for Democracy., NTU CCA Singapore is seeking interested individuals, groups, or organisations to engage with the artist’s works. The Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3 is available to be used for readings, gatherings, discussions, workshops, or other events. Interested parties can appropriate the installation and exhibition space, including the books accompanying the installation, and respond to the exhibition and its title, the artist and the work, or related topics.

The list of authors of the books includes: Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, John Berryman, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, John Dewey, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Luigi Galleani, Emma Goldman, Hafez, Martin Heidegger, Thomas Jefferson, Frank O’Hara, Sylvia Plath, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Rimbaud, Richard Rorty, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, Ahmad Shamlou, Henry David Thoreau, Alfred North Whitehead, Walt Whitman, and Nima Yooshij.

Interested groups are welcome to invite their own audience or to organise events. However, all inhabitations have to happen within the parameters of a public exhibition space.

The exhibition opening hours are Tuesday – Sunday, 12.00 – 7.00pm, but inhabitations may take place during the available timings below:

Monday to Friday, 10.00am – 7.00pm

Saturday and Sunday, 12.00 – 7.00pm

 

If you would like more information, have any questions, or are interested in using the space, please email NTUCCAExhibitions@ntu.edu.sg with the following:

– A description of your planned activity (100–150 words)

– Biography of facilitator or host (100 words)

– Preferred date(s) (and timings, if possible. Activities can be repeated if desired)

– Expected duration of planned activity (if possible)

– Expected profile and number of participants (if possible)

– Please also indicate if you need any equipment that we may be able to provide (e.g. chairs or audio equipment)

 

*Submissions will be reviewed and scheduled on a rolling basis.

 

**Please note this open call is not a commission for a work or an engagement of services and therefore no fees are offered.

 

Image caption: Siah Armajani, Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3, 1988. Installation view of the exhibition Siah Armajani: Follow This Line, Walker Art Center, September 9 – December 30, 2018. Courtesy Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Photo by Bobby Rogers.

Tour: Siah Armajani: Spaces for the Public. Spaces for Democracy.
20 Jul 2019, Sat 03:00 PM - 03:30 PM

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On the first day of exhibition Siah Armajani: Spaces for the Public. Spaces for Democracy., curator Ute Meta Bauer will be giving a guided tour from 3.00 – 3.30pm

Following the tour, from 3.30 – 5.00pm, Victoria Sung, co-curator of Siah Armajani’s major retrospective shown at Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Met Breuer, New York, will expand on Armajani’s practice in her talk Siah Armajani: Follow This Line. Sung will focus on the artist’s Reading Rooms, particularly the one included in the exhibition, Sacco and Vanzetti Reading Room #3, and think through the role of museums as public and educational spaces.

 

More information can be found in the links below.

 

Residencies Insights: The Curator as Meta-Artist. Modes of Curation in the Age of [Aesthetic] Uncertainty, lecture by Alfredo Cramerotti (Italy/United Kingdom), Curator-in-Residence
23 Jul 2019, Tue 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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In this lecture, Alfredo Cramerotti will discuss three curatorial projects which reflect different modes in which curatorial practice can function. Inspired by Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook’s

Rethinking Curating. Art after New Media (The MIT Press, 2010), these three models are described as: 1) the iterative model, in which new projects grow around a selection of works of art or media, changing from venue to venue or from format to format; 2) the modular model, in which one embodiment of the project take places within a multilevel event structure, with the possibility to scale its elements up or down; 3) the broadcast model, where various people create their own infrastructure to circulate content (and the process of curating itself) under a regime of distributed responsibility. Arguing that these curatorial modes are hinged less on the “what” and more on the “how,” Cramerotti eventually defines the practice of working with a combination of these models as “acting as meta-artist.”

 

BIOGRAPHY

Alfredo Cramerotti is a cultural entrepreneur, writer, curator, and broadcaster. He is currently Director of MOSTYN, Llandudno  (Wales, United Kingdom); Head Curator of APT Global–Artist Pension Trust; and Associate Curator of CCANW (Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World).  In recent years, he has curated Sean Scully: Standing on the Edge of the World at the Hong Kong Arts Centre (2018), Shezad Dawood: Leviathan, Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Venice, Italy (2017), three national pavilions at the Venice Biennale (Mauritius in 2015, Wales and Maldives in 2013), and the biennials Sequences VII, Reykjavík, Iceland (2015) and Manifesta 8, Murcia, Spain (2010). He serves as Vice-President of AICA (International Association of Art Critics) and as editor of the Critical Photography book series. His own publications include Forewords: Hyperimages and Hyperimaging (2018), Unmapping the City: Perspectives of Flatness (2010) and Aesthetic Journalism: How to inform without informing (2009). Cramerotti is also a Doctoral Researcher in Communication Design and Photography at the European Centre for Photography, University of South Wales.

 

Image caption: Danilo Correale, Reverie. On the Liberation from Work (detail), ongoing collection of 12-inch LP vinyl records, variable dimensions, 2017. Courtesy the artist

 

Film Programme: Resonating Structures (Line Structures)
23 Jul 2019, Tue - 4 Aug 2019, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Micro-Cosmos 1–4, Stan VanDerBeek, United States, 1983

Colour, sound, 15 min

This is a series of four short computer-animated works, in which the image of an orb is transformed into a pulsating, energetic evocation of life forces.

 

Biography

Stan VanDerBeek(United States) was an American experimental filmmaker who was always at the forefront of technology. He began making experimental films in 1955 and working with computers in 1965, when he produced multimedia pieces and computer animation in collaboration with Bell Labs. In the 1970s, he constructed “Movie-Drome,” an immersive audio-visual laboratory for a new kind of cinema-stage. His multimedia experiments in “expanded cinema” included movie murals, projection systems, planetarium events, and explored early computer graphics and image-processing systems.Vanderbeek was also intimately involved with the artists and art movements of his time, merging art with technology and dance with films.

 

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This film screening is part of the Film Programme: Resonating Structures, which features six of Siah Armajani’s computer-generated short films from the 1970s. For more information on Siah Armajani’s short films, and for the schedules of other screenings within Resonating Structures, please refer to links below.

 

Image Caption: Stan VanDerBeek, Micro-Cosmos 1–4, 1983, Colour, sound, 15 min, film still. Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York.

On Museums Made by Artists, Artist talk by Tun Win Aung (Myanmar)
30 Jul 2019, Tue 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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Tun Win Aung will talk about his long-lasting friendship and multiple collaborations with Phyoe Kyi. Since the artists first met in Yangon’s art school, they established a profound connection which unfolded through continuous conversations, intellectual exchanges, and repeated artistic partnerships. Tun Win Aung will present the collaborative projects developed in Mingun from 2003 and 2013 and The Art & Museum Project, the platform he runs together with artist Wah Nu, which originally triggered Phyoe Kyi’s The Museum Project. While conveying the visionary thrust of Phyoe Kyi’s work, Tun Win Aung will also highlight the challenges related to envisioning a contemporary art institution in the context of Myanmar.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Tun Win Aung (b. 1975, Myanmar) employs a wide range of mediums including photography, video, and installation. His practice focuses on local histories and environments and he often collaborates with artist Wah Nu on large-scale art projects and activities. Their works as a duo have been exhibited in institutional venues such as the Guggenheim Museum, New York, United States (2013); 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan (2011); and biennials including Singapore Biennale (2016); 4th Guangzhou Triennial, China (2011); and the 6th Asia Pacific Triennial, Brisbane, Australia (2009).

 

A public programme of Phyoe Kyi: The Museum Project.

 

Image caption: Tun Win Aung and Wah Nu, digital rendering for Museum Project #4: Thingangyun Museum of Contemporary Art, 2012. Courtesy NNNCL WORKSHOP.

Culture City. Culture Scape.
Public Art Trail at Mapletree Business City II
31 Jul 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
14 Aug 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
28 Aug 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
11 Sep 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
25 Sep 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
9 Oct 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM
23 Oct 2019, Wed 12:30 PM - 01:00 PM

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Meeting point: Alexandra Retail Centre
(460 Alexandra Road, Main Entrance, Taxi Stand)

 

Our upcoming tours are an excellent way to get inspired and unwind in the company of art nestled in the lush compounds of Mapletree Business City II (MBC II). Take a mid-day break and join us with friends or colleagues.

Themed Culture City. Culture Scape., this public art project, commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore comprises works by internationally renowned artists Dan Graham (United States), Zulkifle Mahmod (Singapore), Tomás Saraceno (Argentina/Germany), and Yinka Shonibare(Nigeria/United Kingdom). Inspired by the idea of expanded sculptural environments, the artworks explore the interplay between landscape, architecture, and the broader social and economic environments they are placed in. More than being monumental or site-specific, each work alters or permeates its local context to invite visitors to a broader, richer engagement.

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For more information about our tours, please visit: www.mapletreearts.sg or email ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg.

Please register via Eventbrite.

 

Image caption: Yinka Shonibare, Wind Sculpture I (2013). Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore. 

In The Vitrine:

Nguyen Trinh Thi Landscape Series #1, 2013
28 May 2019, Tue - 1 Sep 2019, Sun 12:00 PM - 07:00 PM

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Interested in the idea of landscapes as a quiet witness to history, artist Nguyen Trinh Thi collects and compilates hundreds of images in which anonymous persons are portrayed pointing towards seemingly empty locations within a landscape. Taken by innumerable Vietnamese press photographers, figures are always captured in the same position, gesturing towards the landscape to indicate a past event, the location of something gone or something lost or missing. We are left with no information about the people and their specific thoughts or feelings, only their repetitious sameness of pointing towards an “evidence” within the silent landscape.

The land bearing witness to the volatile transitions in our geo-political, cultural, and social systems questions the extent of which unsustainable and environmentally-taxing practices effect the environment. Does a landscape harbour ill-feelings towards events and circumstances that have caused it harm? And if it were to break its silence, what forgotten stories would it reveal? Rather than disregarding the land, Nguyen’s photographs suggest these environments contain a plethora of unspoken histories. 

Nguyen’s works are built upon and are often generative of one another. Parallel to this presentation, two of her films, Vietnam the Movie (2015) and Fifth Cinema (2018), will be on view in The Single Screen from 28 May – 9 June and 11 – 23 June respectively. This screening is part of the Centre’s Film Screening Programme: Faces of Histories, 14 May – 17 July 2019.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam) is a Hanoi-based filmmaker and moving image artist. Her diverse practice—traversing boundaries between film and video art, installation and performance—consistently engages with memory and history, and reflects on the roles and positions of art and artists in society and the environment. Nguyen studied journalism, photography, international relations, and ethnographic film in the United States. Her films and video art works have been shown at festivals and art exhibitions including Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art (APT9) in Brisbane (2018); Sydney Biennale 2018; Jeu de Paume, Paris; CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux; the Lyon Biennale 2015; Asian Art Biennial 2015, Taiwan; Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial 2014; Singapore Biennale 2013; Jakarta Biennale 2013; Oberhausen International Film Festival; and the Rotterdam International Film Festival. Nguyen is founder and director of Hanoi DOCLAB, an independent centre for documentary film and the moving image art since 2009. She previously showed at NTU CCA Singapore in the exhibition Ghosts and Spectres – Shadows of History (2017).

 

Image caption: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Mr. Nguyen Tan (on the left) and Mr. Huynh Ngoc Anh (of Phuoc My commune) are pointing to the direction of the river where dozens of people’s homes and gardens have been swallowed by the “patron god of the river.”, from Landscape Series #1, 2013, 20 photographs, colour and black-and-white; 35mm slide projection, 77 slides. Courtesy the artist.

Phyoe Kyi: The Museum Project
22 Jun 2019, Sat - 18 Aug 2019, Sun

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Developed during the last five years of Phyoe Kyi’s life, The Museum Project stands out as one of the artist’s most ambitious, albeit unfinished, undertakings at the time of his sudden death in 2018. Bringing together its three main stages, the presentation in The Lab reflects the development of the architectural design and features several mediums the artist experimented with: an interactive installation (2013), architectural renderings and sketches of artworks and installations (2014 – 15), and a model based on the last architectural project (2018). The presentation also includes a timeline designed by Tun Win Aung and Wah Nu to illustrate the collaboration which originally sparked The Museum Project.

Curated by Anna Lovecchio, Curator, Residencies

 

BIOGRAPHY

Phyoe Kyi (b. 1977 – d. 2018, Myanmar) was a painter, graphic designer, and performance artist based in Taunggyi. He was Artist-in-Residence at NTU CCA Singapore from April to June 2018.

 

Image Caption: Phyoe Kyi, The Museum Project, 2018, video recording of 3D rendering. Courtesy the artist’s estate and NTU CCA Singapore.