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Screening Series: Faces of Histories
14 May 2019, Tue - 18 Jul 2019, Thu

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SCHEDULE

All works will be screened in a loop during opening hours, Tuesday – Sunday, 12.00 – 7.00pm.

14 May – 19 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, From the Dark Depths, 2017

21 May – 26 May 2019: Kiri Dalena, Red Saga, 2004

28 May – 9 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Vietnam the Movie, 2015

11 June – 23 June 2019: Nguyen Trinh Thi, Fifth Cinema, 2018

25 June – 7 July 2019 (except 28 – 30 June): Munem Wasif, Kheyal, 2015–18

9 July – 17 July 2019: Munem Wasif, Machine Matter, 2017

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This screening series features artist films and video works that examine the socio-political and environmental effects colonisation and industrialisation have had on how we frame and perceive places and histories. Artists explore the realities of constructing a new identity amidst changing borders, overwritten cultures, and blurred lines of fact or fiction. The screening series includes works by artists Kiri Dalena (Philippines), Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam), and Munem Wasif (Bangladesh). Each work will be shown for a period of one to two weeks on loop during opening hours.

 

FILM SYNOPSES

14 May – 19 May 2019 

From the Dark Depths, Kiri Dalena, 2017, 27 min

Based on the true story of the drowning of a young activist, Dalena’s film From The Dark Depths opens with a beautiful and surreal sequence underwater in which a woman dances slowly brandishing a red flag. Around her, many red flags are planted in the seabed. This hypnotic and captivating dream is shuttered by sequences with authentic 16mm, analogue, and digital video footage from the artist’s own archive. This includes documentation of political unrest spanning two decades and an ominous long-track of a police car at night prompting the citizens to respect the curfew—a gloomy reminder of a lost freedom.

Kiri Dalena will be in conversation with artist and filmmaker Lucy Raven and curator Philippe Pirotte on 14 May 2019, 7.00 – 8.30pm, as part of the public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again. Details of the programme here.

 

21 May – 26 May 2019

Red Saga, Kiri Dalena, 2004, 15 min

Red Saga (2004), recounts the intense armed hostility towards radical individuals and serves as a call for sustained uprising. Amidst scenes of children faithfully guarding the last harvest from thieves, a red flag is waved with movements building in vigor and determination with each act of silenced injustice. This poetic film offers a glimpse into the passion and pain of the people’s protracted war in the Philippine countryside.

 

28 May – 9 June 2019

Vietnam the Movie, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2015, 45min

Vietnam the Movie uses a carefully structured montage of clips from drama and documentary films to give a chronological account of Vietnamese history from the mid-1950s to the late 1970s, encompassing the end of French colonialism and the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War. The excerpts chosen contrast a variety of external and often oppositional views, ranging from mainstream Hollywood drama to European art-house. Source material from the United States includes Apocalypse NowBorn on the Fourth of July, and Forrest Gump, whilst Europe is represented by the works of Harun Farocki, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, and Jean-Luc Godard. Nguyen also inserts extracts from the films of Nagisa Oshima, Satyajit Ray, and Ann Hui. This technique suggests that any “true” picture of Vietnam has been lost to the multiplicity of symbolic purposes to which the country, its people, and their tribulations have been put. Nguyen’s re-situated selection and collection of archival material offers the viewer an alternative memory and recollection of history.

 

11 June – 23 June 2019

Fifth Cinema, Nguyen Trinh Thi, 2018, 56 min

Foregoing voice in favour of the written wordand juxtaposing moving images of the filmmaker’s own daughter with archival images of Vietnamese women seen through the lens of the “ship’s officers”, Fifth Cinemaslowly leads the viewer through a narrative of colonialism, indigeneity, and cinematic limitations in representation. The film’s text – by Maori filmmaker Barry Barclay, who coined the term “Fourth Cinema” to distinguish Indigenous cinema from the established “First, Second, and Third Cinema” framework– provides structure to Nguyen’s hybrid essay film that moves on multiple cinematic and topical terrains.Fifth Cinema premiered at The 9th Asia Pacific Triennale of Contemporary Art in 2018. 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Kiri Dalena (Philippines) is an acclaimed visual artist and filmmaker known for her works which reveal persistent social injustices and inequalities, particularly in the Philippines. She graduated from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños with an undergraduate degree in Human Ecology, and pursued further studies in 16mm documentary filmmaking at the Mowefund Film Institute. She has been featured in several international art events such as the Singapore Biennale (2013), Yokohama Triennale (2014), and the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015). Her works are currently in the permanent collections of the Singapore Art Museum, Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Ateneo Art Gallery.

 

Nguyen Trinh Thi (Vietnam) is a Hanoi-based filmmaker and moving image artist. Her diverse practice—traversing boundaries between film and video art, installation and performance— consistently engages with memory and history, and reflects on the roles and positions of art and artists in society and the environment. Nguyen studied journalism, photography, international relations, and ethnographic film in the United States. Her films and video art works have been shown at festivals and art exhibitions including Asia Pacific Triennale of Contempory Art (APT9) in Brisbane2018; Sydney Biennale2018; Jeu de Paume, Paris; CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux; the Lyon Biennale 2015; Asian Art Biennial 2015, Taiwan; Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial 2014; Singapore Biennale 2013; Jakarta Biennale 2013; Oberhausen International Film Festivaland the Rotterdam International Film Festival. Nguyen is founder and director of Hanoi DOCLAB, an independent centre for documentary film and the moving image art in Hanoi since 2009. She previously showed at NTU CCA Singapore in the exhibition Ghosts and Spectres – Shadows of History (2017).

 

This screening series runs in parallel to NTU CCA Singapore’s current exhibition Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again, responding to themes of the Singapore Bicentennial.

 

Image caption: Kiri Dalena, Gikan sa Ngitngit nga Kinailadman (From the Dark Depths), 2017, Single-channel video, sound, 27 min. Courtesy the artist.

Screening and conversation: Kiri Dalena and Lucy Raven, moderated by Philippe Pirotte
14 May 2019, Tue 07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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Screenings by Filipino human-right activist, artist, and filmmaker Kiri Dalena and by American artist Lucy Raven will be followed by a conversation with both artists. Based on the true story of the drowning of a young activist, Dalena’s film From The Dark Depths (2017) opens with a beautiful and surreal sequence underwater in which a woman dances slowly brandishing a red flag. Around her, many red flags are planted in the seabed. This hypnotic and captivating dream is shuttered by sequences with authentic 16mm, analog and digital video footage from the artist’s own archive with documentation of political unrest spanning for two decades, and an ominous long-track of a police car at night prompting the citizens to respect the curfew—a gloomy reminder of a lost freedom. Lucy Raven will screen materials connected to a new film-in-progress, alongside several recent short videos

 

BIOGRAPHY

Kiri Dalena (Philippines) is an acclaimed visual artist and filmmaker known for her works which reveal persistent social injustices and inequalities, particularly in the Philippines. She graduated from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños with an undergraduate degree in Human Ecology, and pursued further studies in 16mm documentary filmmaking at the Mowefund Film Institute. She has been featured in several international art events such as the Singapore Biennale (2013), Yokohama Triennale (2014), and the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane (2015). Her works are currently in the permanent collections of the Singapore Art Museum, Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art, and the Ateneo Art Gallery.

 

 

Image caption: Lucy Raven, 3-3-19: Debris flow erosion, wet cement on dry cement and sand-L, 2019, cement and sand on silk, 214 x 133 cm, process documentation. Courtesy the artist.rtist.

Culture City. Culture Scape.
Public Art Trail at Mapletree Business City II
27 Feb 2019, Wed 03:30 PM - 04:00 PM
20 Mar 2019, Wed 03:30 PM - 04:00 PM
17 Apr 2019, Wed 03:30 PM - 04:00 PM
15 May 2019, Wed 03:30 PM - 04:00 PM

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Meeting point: Alexandra Retail Centre
(460 Alexandra Road, Main Entrance, Taxi Stand)

 

Our upcoming guided tour is an excellent way to get inspired and unwind in the company of art. Enjoy a well-deserved cup of coffee and snack while we walk you through the artworks nestled in the lush compounds of Mapletree Business City II (MBC II).

Themed Culture City. Culture Scape., this public art project, commissioned by Mapletree and curated by NTU CCA Singapore comprises works by internationally renowned artists Dan Graham (United States), Zulkifle Mahmod (Singapore), Tomás Saraceno (Argentina/Germany), and Yinka Shonibare (Nigeria/United Kingdom). Inspired by the idea of expanded sculptural environments, the artworks explore the interplay between landscape, architecture, and the broader social and economic environments they are placed in. More than being monumental or site-specific, each work alters or permeates its local context to invite visitors to a broader, richer engagement.

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For more information about our tours, please visit: www.mapletreearts.sg or email ntuccaevents@ntu.edu.sg.

To register, please do so via Eventbrite.

 

Image caption: Yinka Shonibare, Wind Sculpture I (2013). Courtesy NTU CCA Singapore. 

In Conversation Part II: Living with the Sea
with ila (Singapore), Mirwan Andan (Indonesia), Nirwan Arsuka (Indonesia), Zac Langdon-Pole (Aotearoa New Zealand/Germany), Dr Imran bin Tajudeen (Singapore), and Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore), moderated by Philippe Pirotte (Belgium/Germany)
25 May 2019, Sat 03:30 PM - 05:30 PM

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The second session of a two-part conversation, this panel discussion will focus on the history of the straits, historical maps, and the geography of maritime Southeast Asia. This involves an approach to Southeast Asia through underlying indigenous patterns, which will necessarily stretch the limits of ingrained westernised cultural visions and mental habits. The participants will discuss complexities of heritage, notions of belonging, and strategies of mapping. Rather than a static given, the Straits will be considered as an environment with an incipient psychology, invoking a transpiring age-old knowledge of the region, but also as a habitat that continues to profoundly influence our existence.

 

 

BIOGRAPHIES

ila (Singapore) is a visual and performance artist who works with found objects, moving images, and live performance. She seeks to create alternative nodes of experience and entry points into the peripheries of the unspoken, the tacit, and the silenced. With light as her medium of choice, and invisible communities as her point of interest, ila weaves imagined narratives into existing realities. Using her body as a space of tension, negotiation, and confrontation, she creates work that generates discussions about gender, history, and identity in relation to pressing contemporary issues. ila has performed at National Design Centre (2019), Performance Archives Resource Orchestrator, Singapore (2018); and ArtScience Late, Singapore (2018); had a solo presentation at Coda Culture, Singapore (2018); and exhibited at OH! Open House, Singapore (2019); Objectifs – Centre for Photography & Film, Singapore (2016), Ketemu Project Space, Bali (2016), and Unifiedfield, Granada (2015); among others.

 

Mirwan Andan (Indonesia) was born and raised in Watampone, South Sulawesi. From 1999 to 2004, he enrolled at the Universitas Hasanuddin, Makassar, majoring in French Literature. In early 2005, he moved to Jakarta and in 2012 graduated from Political Science, while working in ruangrupa as a researcher and developer since 2007. He was invited to talk in several forums, seminars, and conferences such as Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society Conference, Surabaya (2015); State of Independence – A Global Forum in Alternative Space, Los Angeles (2011); and Expressing Political Aspiration Creatively, Jakarta (2011). In 2015, Andan was researcher for the Jakarta Biennale.

 

Nirwan Ahmad Arsuka (Indonesia) completed his formal education in Nuclear Engineering, Gadjah Mada State University. He has worked as a guest editor for Kompas Daily, a member of the Curator Board of Bentara Budaya Jakarta, and as Director of the Freedom Institute. His writings have appeared in the Inter-Asian Cultural Studies and International Journal of Asian Studies. His publications include Two Essays (Trilingual edition: Indonesian, English, German. 2016), Percakapan dengan Semesta (A Conversation with the Universe) (2017), and Semesta Manusia (This Universe of Mankind) (2018). Since 2014, he has been actively developing Pustaka Bergerak Indonesia (Indonesian Mobile Library Network), a grassroot literacy movement.

 

Zac Langdon-Pole‘s (Aotearoa New Zealand/Germany) work is underpinned by questions of belonging, translation, and identification. He has worked in a variety of media, including sculpture, performance, photography, film, textiles, poetry, installation, and using the work of other artists, to explore the processes of montage, transposition, travelling, reinterpretation, collaboration, and appropriation. He is the latest recipient of the BMW Art Journey Prize (2018), was awarded the Art Viva Prize for Visual Arts in Germany (2017), and received the Charlotte Prinz Stipendium in Darmstadt (2016).

 

Dr Imran bin Tajudeen (Singapore) is Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore. He researches architectural encounters in Singapore and Southeast Asia, first in their intersections with colonial practices, modern interventions, and colonial and nationalist heritage representation, and second through historiographical questions on Southeast Asia’s Indic and Islamic architecture from a vernacular architectural perspective. He was a postdoctoral fellow at MIT’s AKPIA (2009­–10) and the IIAS in Leiden (2010–11). He is co-editor of Southeast Asia’s Modern Architecture: Questions in Translation, Epistemology and Power (2018), and is currently working on a monograph that extends his doctoral dissertation on the local/regional and cosmopolitan in the vernacular urban heritage of Maritime Southeast Asia.

 

Juria Toramae (Thailand/Singapore) is a visual artist. Having had an itinerant childhood, she is interested in place attachment and displacement. Her practice draws on historical and field research and reflects on human relationship with nature. Her work has been presented at the Singapore Art Museum at 8Q; the Singapore International Photography Festival; the Photobook Exhibition for Athens Photo Festival; the Obscura Festival of Photography, Penang; the Chiang Mai University Art Center; and The Substation, Singapore.

 

A public programme of Arus Balik – From below the wind to above the wind and back again.

 

Image caption: Zac Langdon-Pole, Passport (Argonauta) (viii), 2018, paper nautilus shell, Campo del Cielo meteorite (iron; coarse octahedrite, landsite: Chaco / Santiago del Estero, Argentina), 9.4 x 3.1 x 5.3 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Irwan Ahmett and Tita Salina
The Ring of Fire (2014 – ongoing)
13 Apr 2019, Sat - 11 Jun 2019, Tue

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Invisible to the human eye, geological kinships flow under the oceans and lay deep into the earth’s crust. When they manifest themselves, it is often in apocalyptic forms that disrupt existing ecosystems and the course of human life. In geography, The Ring of Fire denotes the volcanic belt and the collision zone of tectonic plates running around the edges of the Pacific Ocean, a deadly area where the majority of the world’s earthquakes and eruptions occur. For Irwan Ahmett and Tita Salina, this geologically unstable territory demarcates a field of artist inquiry.

Since 2014, the Indonesian duo have embarked upon a journey that engages issues of social injustice, political struggles, colonial histories, and environmental crises encountered along erratic routes that stretch from Indonesia to New Zealand, from Taiwan and South Korea to Japan. The Ring of Fire (2014–ongoing) brings together for the first time the most significant works realised by the artists, either together or individually, since the inception of the project.

 

BIOGRAPHIES

An artist duo based in Jakarta, Indonesia, Irwan Ahmett (b.1975) and Tita Salina (b.1973) have been working together since 2010. Their ephemeral interventions articulate sharp social commentaries on urgent issues concerning urban development, ecological catastrophes, political repression, colonial legacies, and the exploitation of human and ecological resources. Spanning from the prankish to the subversive, the duo can mobilise playfulness in the public sphere, irony in radioactive sites, and empathy in relation to conditions of human and environmental vulnerability. Their work has been exhibited at Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media, Japan (2018); Ujazdowski Castle Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw, Poland (2017); ST PAUL St Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand (2016); amongst other international venues.

Ahmett and Salina were Artists-in-Residence at NTU CCA Singapore in March 2018.

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Artist’s Tour
Saturday, 13 April, 3.00 – 4.00pm
 
Join Tita Salina for a walk-through The Ring of Fire. The artist will discuss the origin and the development of this five-year project, charting out the ways in which the works weave together natural catastrophes, historical occurrences, and present-day social and environmental crises.
 
 
 
Image caption: Irwan Ahmett and Tita Salina, Longevity, 2018, film still. Photo by Rangga Aditiawan. Courtesy the artists.